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EAN-139781554511549   EAN-13 barcode 9781554511549
Product NameNative American Thought of It: Amazing Inventions and Innovations (We Thought of It)
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionHeight:9.65 inches / Length:0.16 inches / Weight:0.44 pounds / Width:8.27 inches
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 1554511542
SKUM1554511542
Price New5.76 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used3.95 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width0.31 inches    (convert)
Height11 inches    (convert)
Length8.5 inches    (convert)
Weight7.04 ounces    (convert)
AuthorRocky Landon
Page Count48
BindingPaperback
Published02/01/2013
Long Description
Everyone knows that moccasins, canoes and toboggans were invented by the Aboriginal people of North America, but did you know that they also developed their own sign language, syringe needles and a secret ingredient in soda pop? Depending on where they lived, Aboriginal communities relied on their ingenuity to harness the resources available to them. Some groups, such as the Iroquois, were particularly skilled at growing and harvesting food. From them, we get corn and wild rice, as well as maple syrup. Other groups, including the Sioux and Comanche of the plains, were exceptional hunters. Camouflage, fish hooks, and decoys were all developed to make the task of catching animals easier. And even games—lacrosse, hockey and volleyball—have Native American roots. Other clever inventions and innovations include the following: • Sunscreen • Surgical blades • Diapers • Asphalt • Megaphones • Hair conditioner With descriptive photos and information-packed text, this book explores eight different categories in which the creativity of First Nations peoples from across the continent led to remarkable inventions and innovations, many of which are still in use today.
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Created02-26-2012 6:38:13pm
Modified08-21-2017 9:39:37pm
MD5c0e1f71bcd74aa890d53a94b4905b3ad
SHA2564176c9770510ea02f6443a486965c1e833c2ea913e8ba3aaa63b1f8c0277ae79
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Article of interest

Code 128 is a high-density 1D barcode symbology. This barcode set makes use of the entire 128 ASCII characters which include letter, number and symbols.

Code 128 Barcode

As with all barcodes, there are indicators to identify where the barcode starts and stops. These are marked in yellow below. Code 128 also has a check character which has been marked in green. The remainder of the barcode is the data being encoded. The text below the barcode is optional and is for human consumption in the event the barcode can't be scanned or if people also need to know what the code means.

Code 128 Barcode

Each character in the barcode symbol is composed of three bars and three spaces. Each bar or space must range from 1-4 units and the sum of all the width of all bars must work out to an even number. The stop marker is special because it adds an extra bar of 2 units at the very end (4 bars and 3 spaces). There are three different start markers to to identify which code set is being used. To represent all 128 characters, the code sets can be within a single barcode as needed by using control characters 98-101 (depending on the code set).

The check character is calculated by summing the value of each character and multiplying it by its position. The start character is also part of the sum but is added without weight (multiply by 1 just like the first encoded data character) then when you have the sum take the modulo 103 remainder. This gets a little more complex when mixing modes within a single barcode.

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