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EAN-139780978342845   EAN-13 barcode 9780978342845
Product NameGetting Past No: Negotiating In Difficult Situations
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0553371312
SKU09282011NEW_6386
Price New3.88 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used1.00 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width0.52 inches    (convert)
Height8.27 inches    (convert)
Length5.28 inches    (convert)
Weight6.56 ounces    (convert)
AuthorWilliam Ury
Page Count208
BindingPaperback
Published01/01/1993
FeaturesBantam Books
Long DescriptionWe all want to get to yes, but what happens when the other person keeps saying no?

How can you negotiate successfully with a stubborn boss, an irate customer, or a deceitful coworker?

In Getting Past No, William Ury of Harvard Law School’s Program on Negotiation offers a proven breakthrough strategy for turning adversaries into negotiating partners. You’ll learn how to:

• Stay in control under pressure
• Defuse anger and hostility
• Find out what the other side really wants
• Counter dirty tricks
• Use power to bring the other side back to the table
• Reach agreements that satisfies both sides' needs

Getting Past No is the state-of-the-art book on negotiation for the twenty-first century. It will help you deal with tough times, tough people, and tough negotiations. You don’t have to get mad or get even. Instead, you can get what you want!
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Created10-15-2013 11:34:22pm
Modified10-09-2017 1:33:10pm
MD53a4d67fa8c9c36427ef2961d9e774813
SHA256966b11e14cf04f0534d74788c9a4497456f86b005c9fcf492eb8c605f9968d05
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