Image
EAN-139780822348641   EAN-13 barcode 9780822348641
Product NameCreative License: The Law And Culture Of Digital Sampling
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionHardcover
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0822348640
SKUNU-BNT-00709329
Price New90.93 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used79.67 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width1.06 inches    (convert)
Height8.4 inches    (convert)
Length7.18 inches    (convert)
Weight20.48 ounces    (convert)
AuthorKembrew McLeod, Peter DiCola
Page Count336
BindingHardcover
Published03/14/2011
FeaturesUsed Book in Good Condition
Long DescriptionHow did the Depression-era folk-song collector Alan Lomax end up with a songwriting credit on Jay-Z’s song “Takeover”? Why doesn’t Clyde Stubblefield, the primary drummer on James Brown recordings from the late 1960s such as “Funky Drummer” and “Cold Sweat,” get paid for other musicians’ frequent use of the beats he performed on those songs? The music industry’s approach to digital sampling—the act of incorporating snippets of existing recordings into new ones—holds the answers. Exploring the complexities and contradictions in how samples are licensed, Kembrew McLeod and Peter DiCola interviewed more than 100 musicians, managers, lawyers, industry professionals, journalists, and scholars. Based on those interviews, Creative License puts digital sampling into historical, cultural, and legal context. It describes hip-hop during its sample-heavy golden age in the 1980s and early 1990s, the lawsuits that shaped U.S. copyright law on sampling, and the labyrinthine licensing process that musicians must now navigate. The authors argue that the current system for licensing samples is inefficient and limits creativity. For instance, by estimating the present-day licensing fees for the Beastie Boys’ Paul’s Boutique (1989) and Public Enemy’s Fear of a Black Planet (1990), two albums from hip-hop’s golden age, the authors show that neither album could be released commercially today. Observing that the same dynamics that create problems for remixers now reverberate throughout all culture industries, the authors conclude by examining ideas for reform. Interviewees include David Byrne, Cee Lo Green, George Clinton, De La Soul, DJ Premier, DJ Qbert, Eclectic Method, El-P, Girl Talk, Matmos, Mix Master Mike, Negativland, Public Enemy, RZA, Clyde Stubblefield, T.S. Monk.
Similar Items9781435459724: Music Copyright Law
9781423454588: Music Business Contract Library (Hal Leonard Music Pro Guides)
9781113280978: Music Business Contract Library (Hal Leonard Music Pro Guides)
9780517887844: Music Business Contract Library (Hal Leonard Music Pro Guides)
9781416552154: Appetite For Self-Destruction: The Spectacular Crash Of The Record Industry In The Digital Age
9780822344186: Bound by Law?: Tales from the Public Domain, New Expanded Edition
9783540607731: Business and Society: Stakeholders, Ethics, Public Policy, 14th Edition (Irwin Management)
9780078029479: Business and Society: Stakeholders, Ethics, Public Policy, 14th Edition (Irwin Management)
9780819562975: Club Cultures: Music, Media, and Subcultural Capital (Music/Culture)
9780262633635: Sound Unbound: Sampling Digital Music And Culture
9780156028974: Sound Unbound: Sampling Digital Music And Culture
9780893911324: Selling The Air: A Critique Of The Policy Of Commercial Broadcasting In The United States
9780226777221: Selling The Air: A Critique Of The Policy Of Commercial Broadcasting In The United States
Created11-18-2012 1:05:50pm
Modified05-01-2020 3:36:11am
MD5aec880922c9c7f2e8a704ebf0c16f4fe
SHA256f5945466047c605969e86aa7096a10faf46260af0e705da8360ff7126ac71252
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0325150

Article of interest

The extra items are numerically indexed and provide extra text to go along with numeric values such as weights or distances or even currencies. The attributes that use these extra indexes are all numeric and take two fields. You can send the data in a single field as long as you use the same short or long text that we keep in our database.

Although the data feed API can deliver information as JSON or XML, we are using XML here because it is easier to read.

<attribute>
   <extra_group>Distance</extra_group>
   <field_name>depth</field_name>
   <extra>
      <id>501</id>
      <extra_short>in</extra_short>
      <extra_long>inches</extra_long>
      <seq>10</seq>
   </extra>
   <extra>
      <id>503</id>
      <extra_short>ft</extra_short>
      <extra_long>feet</extra_long>
      <seq>20</seq>
   </extra>
   <extra>
      <id>505</id>
      <extra_short>yrd</extra_short>
      <extra_long>yards</extra_long>
      <seq>30</seq>
   </extra>
</attribute>

Looking at this example, you can see that the EXTRA portion is an array of values each with their own properties. Here is what each section means:

This extra information is normally used in a drop down box next to the numeric data field that we want to enhance. Some examples might be:

You see we can display the long or short version of the extra code by using the ID index.

Fields that make use of this extra information require it when pushing data back to us in the feed. You can either send the data in two fields (value and extra_id) or in a single field (value) as long as the text following the numeric portion matches the long or short version of the extra data we store for the field.

For example, if you wanted to update a field that represented distance with the value "100 yards", you could either send that data just like that in the value field value=100+yards or in two seperate fields value=100&extra_id=505 and you would get the same results. If you send an invalid extra_id or text after the number that doesn't match our accepted list, your update would be rejected.

Close

Search

Close

Share

Close

Dialog