Image
EAN-139780812221435   EAN-13 barcode 9780812221435
Product NameChinese Glazes: Their Origins, Chemistry, And Recreation
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionHeight:10.51 inches / Length:0.75 inches / Weight:2.41 pounds / Width:8.74 inches
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0812221435
SKU9780812221435
Price New29.79 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used29.79 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width0.76 inches    (convert)
Height10.8 inches    (convert)
Length8.67 inches    (convert)
Weight38.56 ounces    (convert)
AuthorNigel Wood
Page Count272
BindingPaperback
Published02/02/2011
FeaturesUsed Book in Good Condition
Long DescriptionSelected by Choice magazine as an Outstanding Academic Book for 2000 Chinese glazes have been admired throughout history for their extraordinary qualities and colors—not least in China itself, where their appearance has been compared variously to jade, to tea-dust, to hare's fur, or to the "color of the sky after the rain." Some Chinese glazes are vibrant and brilliant in tone, while others are deep, complex, and subtle, their properties seeming to change according to ambient light. Chinese glazes have long presented a technical challenge to Western potters, and this book is the most complete account yet of their nature and their reconstruction. The story of Chinese glazes is also the story of Chinese ceramics itself, one of the most fascinating and influential traditions in ceramic history. Chinese Glazes traces the development of China's great high-fired glaze tradition from its roots in the Bronze Age, through the famous monochrome stoneware glazes of the Song dynasty, to the fine porcelain glazes of southern China. The book also examines in detail the story of China's low-fired glazes, from the time of China's first emperor to the present day. The book shows clearly how the potters of ancient China were able to work their ceramic miracles from the simplest recipes, and how modern potters can use and adapt these principles for their own work. The book contains hundreds of recipes for formulating Chinese glazes with Western materials, simple and advanced calculation techniques, as well as efficient blending procedures with local materials. The book is lavishly illustrated, with nearly three hundred photographs, one hundred in full color. These depict examples of the Chinese arts as found in pottery ranging from simple earthenware jars excavated at Neolithic sites to exquisitely designed dishes found in imperial tombs. They also show examples of modern Western ware that employ these remarkable glazing techniques.
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SHA2567cc81b969a826eb354a877b0368d230909323b274d9c3f8d8ab2e04e233ee6a9
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Article of interest

This feature started with version 3.3 of the API and it allows you to update many fields of a product in one call. Prior to this, each attribute for a product was updated in a separate call, causing the process to be a bit slow.

It is important to note that bulk updates only work with JSON formatted data. Because of this, you can leave the mode=json out of your call.

You should use a POST call instead of a GET to avoid over running the length limits that can be found when sending long URLs.

Required Parameters

Optional Parameters

Each entry in the fields array is made up of keys and data. Some keys are required and some are optional depending on the data type being used. These entries mirror the single field update calls used when updating data one field at a time.

Details of the fields entries

An example of the JSON to update multiple fields for a single product

The order of each field in the array doesn't matter. We will process them in sequence but sequence makes no difference. So you don't have to sort them or place them in any partcular order.

You can actually update multiple products at the same time. To do this, you still need to pass some basic information for the first product in the required fields (see above). But in the fields JSON, you create an array of products, each with a fields sub-array. The product listed in the update field would be ignored for the most part but must still be valid. So it can be hardcoded when using this method as long as it is a vaild EAN code. 

An example of the JSON to update multiple fields for multiple products

It doesn't matter if you are updating a single product or multiple products. When the response is returned, the top level status is always going to be code 200 assuming your required fields passed the test. Then you will see an array of products even if you only passed in one to be updated. Each product entry and each field entry will have a status so you will know if individual updates worked or failed. This includes the imageURL you passed.

An example of the JSON returned after an update call


The return results in each img or status field

Try our data update wizard tool to generate sample code.

 

 

 

Examples of how to update images

Here are two examples of updating images. These both use a GET that you can test in your browser as soon as you insert your keycode. No other fields are being updated in these two examples. You would normally want to use POST in your code because there can be issues with very long GET requests losing data off the end. But these examples will work properly as GET or POST.

This first example is updating a single product image in simple mode using only form variables (no JSON)

https://eandata.com/feed/?test=1&v=3&keycode=[YOUR-CODE]&update=0025192251344&field=*bulk*&imageURL=https://schworak.com/image/0025192251344-Jaws.jpg

This next example is also updating a single product image, but because it is using JSON, you could pass multiple products in the outer "fields" array. Notice that each inner product block also has a "fields" list when using JSON.

https://eandata.com/feed/?test=1&v=3&keycode=[YOUR-CODE]&update=0025192251344&field=*bulk*&fields=[{%22ean%22:%220025192251344%22,%22imageURL%22:%22https://schworak.com/image/0025192251344-Jaws.jpg%22,%22fields%22:[]}]

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