Image
EAN-139780810860254   EAN-13 barcode 9780810860254
Product NameFilm, Folklore And Urban Legends
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionPaperback
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0810860252
Price New49.62 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used13.50 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width0.51 inches    (convert)
Height9.15 inches    (convert)
Length6.09 inches    (convert)
Weight12.48 ounces    (convert)
AuthorMikel J. Koven
Page Count216
BindingPaperback
Published10/25/2007
Long DescriptionFrom Alien to When a Stranger Calls, many films are based on folklore or employ an urban legend element to propel the narrative. But once those traditional aspects have been identified, do they warrant further scrutiny? Indeed, why is the study of folklore in popular film important? In Films, Folklore and Urban Legends, Mikel J. Koven addresses this issue by exploring the convergence of folklore with popular cinema studies. Well beyond the identification of traditional motifs in popular cinema, Koven reveals new paradigms of filmic analysis, which open up when one looks at movies through the lens of folklore. In particular, this book focuses on the study of urban legends and how these narratives are used as inspiration for a number of films. Divided into five sections, the book begins with a general survey of the existing literature on folklore/film, predominantly from the perspective of folklore studies. Subsequent chapters address discourses of belief, how urban legends provide the organizing principle of some films, and how certain films "act out" or perform a legend. Movies discussed in this book include Alligator, Candyman, The Curve, Dead Man on Campus, I Know What You Did Last Summer, Urban Legend, Weekend at Bernie's, and The Wicker Man, as well as zombie films, killer bee movies, and slasher films (including Halloween, Black Christmas, The Burning and Terror Train). Koven also devotes attention to key television shows such as The X-Files and Most Haunted. In his analysis, Koven explains not only how film and television narratives are built upon already-existing popular culture beliefs, but also how films and television shows recycle those beliefs back into popular culture. Taken as a whole, Film, Folklore and Urban Legends both stands on its own as the first book-length study of folklore and popular cinema, and as an introductory textbook for the study of folklore and film.
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Created02-26-2012 8:45:38pm
Modified09-14-2017 12:29:54am
MD5c14e93861706eb3a7dbdf34f72de3c7b
SHA256607e67cbeb967be28d97d1812a9fdc12b2b12d190bf1d8a7c34d88ee7f09f6d1
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Article of interest

Barcodes are graphical representations of data that are hard for people to read but very easy for scanners to read. These codes come in various formats and are used all over the place for so many reasons. Some are lines others are blocks and they come in many styles.

Barcodes started out as 1D codes that look like a series of virtical lines taht come in various thincknesses and represent a small amount of date. Some examples include EAN, UPC and ISBN which are found on products and books you encounter every day. Here are some samples:

UPC Barcode

UPC-A Code

 

EAN Barcode

EAN-13 / ISBN-13 Code

 

For slightly more complex data that includes numbers and letters and some times punctuation, there are other types of barcodes such as Code 39, Code 128, Interleaved 2 of, Codabar, MSI and Plessey. Examples of these are shown here:

Barcode Code 39

Code 39 (limited text)

 

Barcode Code 128

Code 128 (full text)

 

Interleave 2 of 5

Interleave 2 of 5 (digits only)

 

Barcode Codabar

Codabar (digits and limited punctuation)

 

Barcode MSI

MSI (digits only)

 

Barcode Plessey

Plessey (digits and letters A-F)

 

You can see that all of these have the same basic format of vertical lines. They are actually very different in the the way they encode the data though and not all scanners can understand all of the different barcodes.

There are also a number of 2D barcodes. These look like retangles or squares filled with dots or blocks. These require image scanners that can see the entire image not just a stripe through the middle of the code. There are several different types of these codes. One of the most popular codes at the moment is the QR Code which stands for Quick Response Code and you have probably seen it in advertisements. Here are some examples of 2D barcodes.

Barcode QR Code

QR Code

 

Barcode PDF417

PDF417

 

Barcode Aztec

Aztec

 

Barcode Maxicode

Maxicode

 

Barcode Data Matrix

Data Matrix

You can see that these are far more complex than the standard 1D barcodes. They also store a lot more data in a much smaller area in relative terms. You will find these in warehouses and on shipping packages. Many people and government agencies are using these codes on ID badges and ID cards to store information.

If you need to make your own barcodes, you can do it here on this site. We have two pages related to making barcodes. One page for 1D and one for 2D barcodes because the two are created in very different ways. Use these links to get to the pages where you can make your own FREE barcodes.

1D Barcodes or 2D QR Codes

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