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EAN-139780802092809   EAN-13 barcode 9780802092809
Product NameTracing The Connected Narrative: Arctic Exploration In British Print Culture, 1818-1860 (Studies In Book And Print Culture)
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0802092802
SKU9780802092809ING
Price New45.31 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used63.21 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width6 inches    (convert)
Height8.76 inches    (convert)
Length1.18 inches    (convert)
Weight24 ounces    (convert)
AuthorJanice Cavell
Page Count352
BindingHardcover
Published12/27/2008
Long Description

By the 1850s, journalists and readers alike perceived Britain's search for the Northwest Passage as an ongoing story in the literary sense. Because this 'story' appeared, like so many nineteenth-century novels, in a series of installments in periodicals and reviews, it gained an appeal similar to that of fiction. Tracing the Connected Narrative examines written representations of nineteenth-century British expeditions to the Canadian Arctic. It places Arctic narratives in the broader context of the print culture of their time, especially periodical literature, which played an important role in shaping the public's understanding of Arctic exploration.

Janice Cavell uncovers similarities between the presentation of exploration reports in periodicals and the serialized fiction that, she argues, predisposed readers to take an interest in the prolonged quest for the Northwest Passage. Cavell examines the same parallel in relation to the famous disappearance and subsequent search for the Franklin expedition. After the fate of Sir John Franklin had finally been revealed, the Illustrated London News printed a list of earlier articles on the missing expedition, suggesting that the public might wish to re-read them in order to 'trace the connected narrative' of this chapter in the Arctic story. Through extensive research and reference to new archival material, Cavell undertakes this task and, in the process, recaptures and examines the experience of nineteenth-century readers.

Created11-09-2012 7:06:28am
Modified01-13-2014 9:04:39am
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SHA2566c0e6a034f5e4566e523e9aaaaa00ed21e146a6258b18b551c4b133b50b0d28f
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Like so many sites, we use AdSense to generate income through this web site. And some of the things we do are to make sure we stay in compliance with the AdSense policies.

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