EAN-139780801833953   EAN-13 barcode 9780801833953
Product NameThe Scary Mason-Dixon Line: African American Writers And The South (Southern Literary Studies)
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionHardcover
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0801833957
AuthorTrudier Harris
Page Count256
BindingHardcover
Published06/01/2009
Long DescriptionNew Yorker James Baldwin once declared that a black man can look at a map of the United States, contemplate the area south of the Mason-Dixon Line, and thus Ascare himself to death. In The Scary Mason-Dixon Line, renowned literary scholar Trudier Harris explores why black writers, whether born in Mississippi, New York, or elsewhere have consistently both loved and hated the South. Harris explains that, for these authors the South represents not so much a place or even a culture as a rite of passage. Not one of them can consider himself or herself a true African American writer without confronting the idea of the South in a decisive way. Harris considers native born black southerners Raymond Andrews, Ernest J. Gaines, Edward P. Jones, Tayari Jones, Yusef Komunyakaa, Randall Kenan, and Phyllis Alesia Perry, and nonsouthern writers James Baldwin, Sherley Anne Williams, and Octavia E. Butler. The works Harris examines date from Baldwin's Blues for Mr. Charlie (1964) to Edward P. Jones's The Known World (2003). By including Komunyakaa's poems and Baldwin's play, as well as male and female authors, Harris demonstrates that the writers' preoccupation with the South cuts across lines of genre and gender. Whether their writings focus on slavery, migration from the South to the North, or violence on southern soil, and whether they celebrate the triumph of black southern heritage over repression or castigate the South for its horrible treatment of blacks, these authors cannot escape the call of the South. Indeed, Harris asserts that creative engagement with the South represents a defining characteristic of African American writing. A singular work by one of the foremost literary scholars writing today, The Scary Mason-Dixon Line superbly demonstrates how history and memory continue to figure powerfully in African American literary creativity.
Created11-13-2012 10:34:10am
Modified05-01-2020 2:00:52am
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SHA25634ddd025607624c4700e1b231cb77c4c01f6d9dfb21ab6e0ce925baca9f54c10
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This is just a general comment to those that might be interested in some technical info about our site and how Google interacts with it.

Google is frigging amazing!

Their programmers are very curtious when it comes to their spiders and how they interact with various web sites. Apparently, they are sensative to the load that their spiders place on a web server and do a darn good job when it comes to not overloading a server.

Another major search engine is not quite so nice. If you don't tell them to leave you alone, they will hammer the heck out of your site and potentially bring you to your knees.

Over the past vew days, we have been doing a massive system backup to a couple new off-site backup servers. Normally, this process is pretty quick but because these were new servers they required fully syncronization. Well, I forgot to take into account the drain this could place on our server and I let more than one backup run at a time.

This caused our main server to experience a high load for several days. Google detected this load and backed off its crawling process which was very kind of them. The only bad thing is that when Google backed off, our monitoring process (mostly manual at this point) assumed everything was only slightly higher than normal.

Google may be awesome, but it can be frustrating some times too.

This cool and wonderful feature that Google has in place to prevent overloading a server had an unexpected side affect. Because Google thought our site was super busy (which it was) it reduced the number of people it was referring to the site too. DOH!

As we noticed the visitor count slowly drop we got very confused because the system load was still very high. And we noticed Google wasn't visiting as often as usual and then we saw it... The backup process had overloaded the system. Not to the extreme but enough to make Google think there was a problem. We still actually had plenty of bandwidth for real users just not as much for the bots that visit (which we limit when bandwidth is limited).

Anyway, it was a good learning experience and we are now seeing the referrals climb back up and the Google spider is picking up its pace again too.

We had to force a couple other bots (including that othe big search engine) to play nice because they were trying to take more than their share of our data.

All in all, Google is AWESOME and very powerful. So THANKS GOOGLE for playing nice with others!

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