Image
EAN-139780789211279   EAN-13 barcode 9780789211279
Product NameThe Grand Medieval Bestiary: Animals In Illuminated Manuscripts
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionWeight:0 pounds
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0789211270
Price New285.79 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used487.01 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width13.1 inches    (convert)
Height4.2 inches    (convert)
Length19 inches    (convert)
Weight260 ounces    (convert)
AuthorChristian Heck, Rémy Cordonnier
Page Count620
BindingHardcover
Published12/11/2012
FeaturesUsed Book in Good Condition
Long Description
As the 587 colorful images in this magnificent volume reveal, animals were a constant and delightful presence in illuminated manuscripts throughout the Middle Ages. Many proto-zoological illustrations, of great charm but variable accuracy, are found in the bestiaries, or compendiums of animal lore, that were exceedingly popular in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. But animals are depicted in every other sort of illuminated manuscript as well, from the eighth-century Echternach Gospels, with its geometrically schematized symbols of the Evangelists, to the early fifteenth-century Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry, with its famously naturalistic scenes of peasant and aristocratic life.

In his insightful opening chapters, the noted art historian Christian Heck explains that the prevalence of animals in illuminated manuscripts reflects their importance in medieval thought, an importance due in part to the agricultural society of that age, in which a variety of speciesand not just docile petswere the daily companions of man. Animals also had a greater symbolic significance than they do today: in popular fables, such as those of Reynard the Fox, they held up a mirror to the follies of mankind, and on the religious plane, they were understood as an integral part of God’s creation, whose attributes and behaviors could be taken as clues to His plan of salvation.

The main part of the book explores the complex and fascinating iconography of the individual creatures most frequently depicted by medieval miniaturists. It is arranged in the manner of a proper bestiary, with essays on one hundred animals alphabetized by their Latin names, from the alauda, or lark, whose morning song was thought to be a hymn to Creation, to the vultur, which enjoyed a certain respect due to its impressive appearance, but whose taste for carrion also made it a symbol of the sinner who indulges in worldly pleasures. The selection includes a number of creatures that would now be considered fantastic, including the griffin, the manticore, and of course the fabled unicorn, tamable only by a gentle maiden.

Not merely a study of art history, The Grand Medieval Bestiary uses a theme of timeless interest to present a panorama of medieval life and thought that will captivate even the most sophisticated modern reader.
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Created11-22-2012 2:19:36pm
Modified04-30-2017 7:52:05am
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SHA256e15a0eeed7e9ea848607e82fdcba8e8195641ebb2c384027da99d4dc8fca2960
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Article of interest

Here we will demonstrate the most basic example of importing the CSV data files that we produce on this site into your MySQL database.

For information about various databases you can use and how to import CSV files into them, please view the overview article "Importing CSV data into your database".

For this example, we are going to import the product data CSV file out of the sample_ean_data.zip but this same process will work on the full data download file. We will also be executing the commands in the MySQL Workbench but you can also use the command line tool with the same commands if you like.

First, start by creating a blank table. Use the table layout described in the read_me file for the most up-to-date table layout. It is suggested that you not use any indexing at this point. You can add indexes later. It is most likely that you will have your own tables where you want to store your data so importing the CSV files can be done into temporary tables and then later copied over to your tables. Leaving off the indexes and constraints on these import tables reduces the risk of import errors. Here is an example:

create table ean_product
(
    EAN13             varchar(13),
    UPCA              varchar(12),
    UPCE              varchar(8),
    SKU               varchar(200),
    PriceNew          numeric(15,2),
    PriceUsed         numeric(15,2),
    PriceDate         date,
    company           varchar(13),
    product           varchar(100),
    description       varchar(100),
    category          int,
    url               varchar(500),
    created           datetime,
    modified          datetime
);

Next we perform the import using the LOAD DATA INFILE command. The path to the file depends on where you saved the data and which operating system you are on. For Windows users you might find your file on the C: drive and Linux users may find your date in your home (~) folder. This example shows a Linux import. Only the path would be different between the operating systems.

LOAD DATA LOCAL
    INFILE '~/sample_ean_data/sample_ean_product.csv' 
    INTO TABLE ean_product
    FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' ENCLOSED BY '"' ESCAPED BY '\\'
    LINES TERMINATED BY '\r\n'
    IGNORE 1 LINES;

Finally, lets look at the data that we just imported.

SELECT * FROM EAN_PRODUCT;

You may have seen some warnings after the import command. If you are concerned about these warnings, examine the data. It could be that some data has grown beyond the size specified in the read_me file. If you are worried, make the fields larger and try the process again after deleting all of the data out of the table.

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