Image
EAN-139780767898768   EAN-13 barcode 9780767898768
Product NameSanford and Son - The First Season
LanguageEnglish
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie / TV
Short DescriptionWeight:0.42 pounds
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B000068V9Y
SKUDS29990
Model2226828
Price New7.48 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used1.54 US Dollars    (curriencies)
IMDbIMDb Link
Run Time78 minutes
Aspect Ratio1.33:1
CastDemond Wilson, LaWanda Page, Lynn Hamilton, Redd Foxx, Whitman Mayo
Run Time78 minutes
Width5.5 inches    (convert)
Height0.75 inches    (convert)
Length7.75 inches    (convert)
Weight42 hundredths pounds    (convert)
BindingDVD
FormatMultiple Formats, Closed-captioned, Color, NTSC, Subtitled
Run Time78 minutes
FeaturesFactory sealed DVD
Long Description"Elizabeth! I'm comin, honey!" Those were the words often heard coming from 9114 South Central, home to Fred Sanford (Redd Foxx) and his son Lamont (Demond Wilson) - known more affectionately to each other as "Pop" and "Dummy" - and their junkyard business. Sanford and Son was the second TV series from Norman Lear and Bud Yorkin, who created the groundbreaking "All in the Family" the year before. "Sanford and Son" aired from 1972-1977 and was NBC's most popular prime-time series for four of its five seasons, earning four Emmy nominations and a Golden-Globe Award for Redd Foxx during its run. Enjoy this hysterical first season - or you'll get one across the lip.
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Created12-12-2012 12:34:59pm
Modified04-29-2019 5:23:33am
MD5e1272da519eb1204f093f639316951ff
SHA2560529ecc35ae0248dbfd50b07e96ed3bee7fe4c3048a039012fd7b7dc8930d66d
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0117979

Article of interest

This symbology was developed by the MSI Data Corporation and is based on the Plessey Code symbology. MSI is most often used in warehouses and inventory control.

This is a continuous non-self-checking symbology meaning it has no predetermined length and there is no validation built into the barcode itself. If you want to validate the data stored in the barcode, you would need to use a check digit. Mod 10 is the most common check digit used with MSI but you can also use mod 1010 or mod 1110. It is allowed but generally not a good idea to omit the check digit all together.

There is a start marker which is represented by three binary digits 110 (where 1 is black and 0 is white). There is also a stop marker which is represented by four binary digits 1001. The remaining markers represent the numeric digits 0-9 (no text or special characters) and each digit is represented by twelve binary digits. Below is a table that describes all of the possible markers. The start and stop markers are the main difference between MSI and Plessey. That and the fact that MSI only covers digits 0-9. You can read these stripes as a binary values where 110 is binary 1 and 100 is binary 0. The stop marker simply has an extra bit on the end.

Character Stripe Bits Binary Value
START 110 1
0 100100100100 0000
1 100100100110 0001
2 100100110100 0010
3 100100110110 0011
4 100110100100 0100
5 100110100110 0101
6 100110110100 0110
7 100110110110 0111
8  110100100100 1000
9  110100100110 1001
STOP 1001 0 + extra stripe

 To create a graphical barcode using this process, you can simply string together a series of 1 and 0 graphic images once you have calculated what your barcode should look like using the table shown above. You can view the source code of this page if you want to see how we created the example shown below.

Code [start]375[stop]
Bits: 110 100100110110 100110110110 100110100110 1001
Graphic:

This is just an example of one way to perform the graphic encoding. It is often easier to just draw the lines instead of tacking together individual images. If you would like to create free MSI barcodes, please visit our barcode generator page. You can save the images you make and use them as needed.

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