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EAN-139780756785116   EAN-13 barcode 9780756785116
Product NameClubland: The Fabulous Rise And Murderous Fall Of Club Culture
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0756785111
Price New66.15 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used6.95 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width6.5 inches    (convert)
Height9.25 inches    (convert)
Length1 inches    (convert)
Weight22.4 ounces    (convert)
AuthorFrank Owen
Page Count323
BindingHardcover
Published11/30/2003
Long DescriptionOutrageous parties. Brazen drug use. Fantastical costumes. Celebrities. Wannabes. Gender-bending club kids. Pulse-pounding beats. Sinful orgies. Botched police raids. Depraved criminals. Murder. Welcome to the decadent nineties club scene.   In 1995, journalist Frank Owen began researching a story on Special K, a designer drug that fueled the after-midnight club scene.  He went to buy and sample the drug at the internationally notorious Limelight, a crumbling church converted into a Manhattan disco, where mesmerizing music, ecstatic dancers, and uninhibited sideshows attracted long lines of hopeful onlookers.  Owen discovered a world where reckless hedonism was elevated to an art form, and where the ever-accelerating party finally spun out of control in the hands of notorious club owner Peter Gatien and his minions. In Clubland , Owen reveals how a lethal drug ring operated in a lawless, black-lit realm of fantasy, and how, when the lights came up, their excesses left countless victims in their wake.  Praised for his risk-taking and exhilarating writing style, Frank Owen has spawned a hybrid of literary nonfiction and true crime, capturing the zeitgeist of a world that emerged in the spirit of “peace, love, unity and respect,” and ended in tragedy. 
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Created09-10-2012 10:06:11am
Modified05-01-2020 12:48:26am
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SHA2567a3efa2def02062b36bc69cec49e02fff455b1ab67832034146f7cb4b0f30d09
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