Image
EAN-139780745316598   EAN-13 barcode 9780745316598
Product NameIraq Under Siege: The Deadly Impact Of Sanctions And War
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionPaperback
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 074531659X
SKUMON0000305138
Price New45.00 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used3.80 US Dollars    (curriencies)
AuthorAnthony Arnove
Page Count192
BindingPaperback
Published04/01/2000
Long DescriptionThis text provides an overview of how sanctions are devastating Iraq. For nearly a decade now, the Iraqi people have borne the hardship of life under harsh sanctions. More than one million people, many of them children under five, have died due to the sustained bombing attacks and the deprivation caused by the sanctions. Because th sanctions have prevented Iraq from importing basic necessities needed for medical treatment, easily preventable diseases have taken a devastating toll on the Iraqi population. Meanwhile, Saddam Hussein and his ruling elite - the supposed target of the West's campaign - remain unaffected. In this collection, leading voices against the sanctions document the human, environmental and social toll of the United States-led war against Iraq. The contributors are John Pilger, Robert Fisk, Noam Chomsky, Denis Halliday, Howard Zinn, Edward Said, Phyllis Bennis, Barbara Nimri Aziz, Kathy Kelly, Voices in the Wilderness, Rania Masri Naseer Aruri, Dr Huda S. Ammash, Sharon Smith, Dr Peter Pellett, George Capaccio, and Ali Abunimah. Carefully documented, thoroughly researched and written in clear language, the book should be useful for anyone wanting to understand the roots of Western policy in Iraq and the Middle East. The volume also includes photographs and first person accounts from Iraq that show the human story of the sanctions, ending with concrete ideas on how people can help end them.
Created11-13-2012 1:34:17pm
Modified09-09-2018 9:41:41am
MD5897796aacc84cfb20762b44271e7e377
SHA2565e46fb3adcd2270719de77e1ca12da00edf04c0223b7d50f6ca6ba769775f740
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