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EAN-139780713991826   EAN-13 barcode 9780713991826
Product NameCod: A Biography Of The Fish That Changed The World
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionPaperback
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0140275010
SKUMON0000055306
Price New6.30 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used2.81 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width0.5 inches    (convert)
Height7.1 inches    (convert)
Length5 inches    (convert)
Weight6.88 ounces    (convert)
AuthorMark Kurlansky
Page Count294
BindingPaperback
Published08/18/2010
FeaturesPenguin Books
Long DescriptionFrom the Bestselling Author of Salt and The Basque History of the World Cod, Mark Kurlansky’s third work of nonfiction and winner of the 1999 James Beard Award , is the biography of a single species of fish, but it may as well be a world history with this humble fish as its recurring main character. Cod, it turns out, is the reason Europeans set sail across the Atlantic, and it is the only reason they could. What did the Vikings eat in icy Greenland and on the five expeditions to America recorded in the Icelandic sagas? Cod, frozen and dried in the frosty air, then broken into pieces and eaten like hardtack. What was the staple of the medieval diet? Cod again, sold salted by the Basques, an enigmatic people with a mysterious, unlimited supply of cod. As we make our way through the centuries of cod history, we also find a delicious legacy of recipes, and the tragic story of environmental failure, of depleted fishing stocks where once their numbers were legendary. In this lovely, thoughtful history, Mark Kurlansky ponders the question: Is the fish that changed the world forever changed by the world's folly?   “A charming fish tale and a pretty gift for your favorite seafood cook or fishing monomaniac. But in the last analysis, it’s a bitter ecological fable for our time.” –Los Angeles Times   “Every once in a while a writer of particular skill takes a fresh, seemingly improbable idea and turns out a book of pure delight. Such is the case of Mark Kurlansky and the codfish.” –David McCullough   “One of the 25 Best Books of the Year.” –The New York Public Library Mark Kurlansky is the author of many books including Salt, The Basque History of the World , 1968 , and The Big Oyster . His newest book is Birdseye.
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Created09-05-2012 10:06:11am
Modified04-30-2020 11:44:33pm
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SHA2561a260b6057953f68d0d3438318f2e1832a93837614972257071162be836a774a
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An article of interest

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Plessey Barcodes

Plessey barcodes, also known as Plessey Code or Plessey Pattern, are a type of linear barcode symbology that encode data using a series of varying width bars and spaces. Developed in the 1970s by the Plessey Company in the United Kingdom, Plessey barcodes were initially used for retail price marking and inventory control. While not as widely used as some other barcode types today, Plessey barcodes remain relevant in certain niche applications, particularly in areas where legacy systems are still in use or where compatibility with older technology is required.

One of the distinguishing features of Plessey barcodes is their simplicity and ease of decoding. Plessey barcodes consist of alternating black and white bars of varying widths, with each combination representing a specific numeric or alphanumeric character. Despite their simplicity, Plessey barcodes can encode a limited amount of data, typically comprising numeric digits or a small set of alphanumeric characters. This makes them suitable for applications where only basic identification or tracking information is required, such as library books or asset tagging.

However, with the advent of more advanced barcode symbologies capable of encoding larger amounts of data, Plessey barcodes have seen a decline in usage in favor of more versatile options. Nonetheless, they still find occasional use in specific industries or applications where compatibility with existing systems is necessary. Overall, while Plessey barcodes may not be as prevalent as they once were, their legacy lives on in certain niche markets and serves as a reminder of the early days of barcode technology.

Another variation is known as the MSI Code.

Plessey offers a full range of HEX digits 0-F. The bit pattern of the bits sets the high order bit at the right which is reverse of how we normally think of bits these days. (MSI puts the high order bit on the left).

The start bar is always "D" (1101) and the terminator can be two binary 1's (11) if the barcode is to be read from left to right only. If the barcode can be read in either direction the terminator will be a single binary 1 (1) and is followed by a reverse of the start character or the "B" (1011).

Digit Strip Bits Binary Value
0 100100100100 0000
1 110100100100 1000
2 100110100100 0100
3 110110100100 1100
4 100100110100 0010
5 110100110100 1010
6 100110110100 0110
7 110110110100 1110
8 100100100110 0001
9 110100100110 1001
A 100110100110 0101
B 110110100110 1101
C 100100110110 0011
D 110100110110 1011
E 100110110110 0111
F 110110110110 1111
START 110110100110 1101
STOP > 110110 11
STOP < > 110110100110110 11011

You can use the stripe bits can be used to generate the graphic pattern. If you want to see this trick, check out the MSI Code page. Plessey uses a cyclic (or polynomial) check code technique which is applied to the reading of barcode labels and transmission of data. This technique is a fair compromise between the extra redundancy and the error detecting power. Roughly one undetected error per hundred million 6 digit transactions.

If you would like to generate your own Plessey Barcode, please visit our free barcode generator page. Make your code, save it and use it how ever you like.