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EAN-139780521863308   EAN-13 barcode 9780521863308
Product NameCross-Cultural Exchange In The Atlantic World: Angola And Brazil During The Era Of The Slave Trade (African Studies)
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionWeight:1.3 pounds
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0521863309
SKU691831
Price New69.95 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used16.24 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width0.75 inches    (convert)
Height8.98 inches    (convert)
Length5.98 inches    (convert)
Weight20.8 ounces    (convert)
AuthorRoquinaldo Ferreira
Page Count282
BindingHardcover
Published04/09/2012
FeaturesUsed Book in Good Condition
Long DescriptionThis book argues that Angola and Brazil were connected, not separated, by the Atlantic Ocean. Roquinaldo Ferreira focuses on the cultural, religious, and social impacts of the slave trade on Angola. Reconstructing biographies of Africans and merchants, he demonstrates how cross-cultural trade, identity formation, religious ties, and resistance to slaving were central to the formation of the Atlantic world. By adding to our knowledge of the slaving process, the book powerfully illustrates how Atlantic slaving transformed key African institutions, such as local regimes of forced labor that predated and coexisted with Atlantic slaving, and made them fundamental features of the Atlantic world's social fabric.
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Created01-12-2013 1:25:59am
Modified10-10-2017 9:32:17am
MD5defc953a08114a65336cf81760984650
SHA25605f8fb72b956cd3629da2b45f5f9c6e6ed73d8ac6a549609ae1d128c27ec0d75
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