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EAN-139780521060059   EAN-13 barcode 9780521060059
Product NameThe Time Traveler's Guide To Medieval England: A Handbook For Visitors To The Fourteenth Century
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionHardcover
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 1439112894
Price New12.64 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used4.98 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width1.1 inches    (convert)
Height9.25 inches    (convert)
Length6.12 inches    (convert)
Weight17.6 ounces    (convert)
AuthorIan Mortimer
Page Count352
BindingHardcover
Published12/29/2009
Long DescriptionThe past is a foreign country. This is your guidebook. A time machine has just transported you back to the fourteenth century. What do you see? How do you dress? How do you earn a living and how much are you paid? What sort of food will you be offered by a peasant or a monk or a lord? And more important, where will you stay? The Time Traveler’s Guide to Medieval England is not your typical look at a historical period. This radical new approach shows us that the past is not just something to be studied; it is also something to be lived. All facets of everyday life in this fascinating period are revealed, from the horrors of the plague and war to the ridiculous excesses of roasted larks and medieval haute couture. Through the use of daily chronicles, letters, household accounts, and poems of the day, Mortimer transports you back in time, providing answers to questions typically ignored by traditional historians. You will learn how to greet people on the street, what to use as toilet paper, why a physician might want to taste your blood, and how to know whether you are coming down with leprosy. From the first step on the road to the medieval city of Exeter, through meals of roast beaver and puffin, Mortimer re-creates this strange and complex period of history. Here, the lives of serf, merchant, and aristocrat are illuminated with re-markable detail in this engaging literary journey. The result is the most astonishing social history book you’re ever likely to read: revolutionary in its concept, informative and entertaining in its detail, and startling for its portrayal of humanity in an age of violence, exuberance, and fear.
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Created07-16-2012 1:05:00am
Modified04-30-2020 9:29:27pm
MD5db954ac4b4b9a4e1a284767e57987b9b
SHA256846097476f933df1f72b95b5835131a26b901b345e5dc1022cf0a151cd21b97f
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Article of interest

With version 3.2 comes a new way to handle product images. This should give you more control over the images you display.

Prior to version 3.2, you simply had to check for the existance of the product>image property. If it existed and was not blank, you could safely display the image. 

Starting with version 3.2, you may want to check one more field before you display the product image. Many API users wanted access to the pending images. The only reasonable way to do this was to add a new property named product>hasImage which can be one of four values.

If you are displaying the product images to your users and you DO NOT want to display pending images that have not been checked, you should only display the image if product>hasImage=Yes. If you want to show production and pending images, you can simply check the product>image property if you like. We suggest using product>hasImage as your main check and only display the image if it meets your needs. Here are samples of the JSON structure.

The property product>hasImage will always be regurned even if you specified a list of properties in the "get" string that does not include the image property. The main reason for this is that it is possible to calculate the image path on your side thereby saving the bandwidth of returning the image path.

If you want to calculate the path to the image on your end instead of requesting it from us, you can do this in two ways. 

  1. If product>hasImage=Pending then simply use the path https://eandata.com/image/pending/{13_digit_EAN}.jpg
  2. If product>hasImage=Yes then it gets a little more tricky. We split the images into subfolders because there are so many of them. To calculate the path start with the 13 digit EAN and split it up like this: https://eandata.com/image/product/{1st_3_digits}/{2nd_3_digits}/{3rd_3_digits}/{13_digit_EAN}.jpg

This should make interacting with product and pending images much easier for you. Look at the example JSON shown above for working exmples of image paths.

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