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EAN-139780373222391   EAN-13 barcode 9780373222391
Product NameThe Time Traveler's Guide To Medieval England: A Handbook For Visitors To The Fourteenth Century
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionPaperback
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 1439112908
Price New5.99 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used3.35 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width0.9 inches    (convert)
Height9.25 inches    (convert)
Length6.12 inches    (convert)
Weight14.88 ounces    (convert)
AuthorIan Mortimer
Page Count352
BindingPaperback
Published10/25/2011
FeaturesTouchstone Books
Long DescriptionNow in paperback, a literary time machine that takes readers into the sights, smells, and tastes of the fourteenth century—a book that is revolutionary in its concept and startling in its portrayal of humanity. The past is a foreign country. This is your guidebook. A time machine has just transported you back into the fourteenth century. What do you see? How do you dress? How do you earn a living and how much are you paid? What sort of food will you be offered by a peasant or a monk or a lord? And more important, where will you stay? The Time Traveler’s Guide to Medieval England is not your typical look at a historical period. This radical new approach shows us that the past is not just something to be studied; it is also something to be lived. Through the use of daily chronicles, letters, household accounts, and poems of the day, Mortimer transports you back in time, providing answers to questions typically ignored by traditional historians. You will learn how to greet people on the street, what to use as toilet paper, why a physician might want to taste your blood, and how to know whether you are coming down with leprosy. The result is the most astonishing social history book you’re ever likely to read: revolutionary in its concept, informative and entertaining in its detail, and startling for its portrayal of humanity in an age of violence, exuberance, and fear.
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Created04-28-2012 1:05:00am
Modified04-30-2020 6:52:22pm
MD5ef7a38095a1c0a280315826dfdeb594a
SHA2563e3a541282d0f3c9cc5005d9b2fd1ff729600620d07cdd636a8cf46e6d9f1b12
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0276649

Article of interest

This symbology was developed by the Plessey Company in England. A variation of Plessey was used by the ADS Company and is known as Anker Code. Anker Code was used in European point of sale systems prior to the advent of EAN. Another variation is known as the MSI Code.

Plessey offers a full range of HEX digits 0-F. The bit pattern of the bits sets the high order bit at the right which is reverse of how we normally think of bits these days. (MSI puts the high order bit on the left).

The start bar is always "D" (1101) and the terminator can be two binary 1's (11) if the barcode is to be read from left to right only. If the barcode can be read in either direction the terminator will be a single binary 1 (1) and is followed by a reverse of the start character or the "B" (1011).

Digit Strip Bits Binary Value
0 100100100100 0000
1 110100100100 1000
2 100110100100 0100
3 110110100100 1100
4 100100110100 0010
5 110100110100 1010
6 100110110100 0110
7 110110110100 1110
8 100100100110 0001
9 110100100110 1001
A 100110100110 0101
B 110110100110 1101
C 100100110110 0011
D 110100110110 1011
E 100110110110 0111
F 110110110110 1111
START 110110100110 1101
STOP > 110110 11
STOP < > 110110100110110 11011

You can use the stripe bits can be used to generate the graphic pattern. If you want to see this trick, check out the MSI Code page. Plessey uses a cyclic (or polynomial) check code technique which is applied to the reading of barcode labels and transmission of data. This technique is a fair compromise between the extra redundancy and the error detecting power. Roughly one undetected error per hundred million 6 digit transactions.

If you would like to generate your own Plessey Barcode, please visit our free barcode generator page. Make your code, save it and use it how ever you like.

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