Image
EAN-139780307379061   EAN-13 barcode 9780307379061
Product NameThe Pirates Of Somalia: Inside Their Hidden World
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 030737906X
SKUNEW-COMMON-54766
Price New3.97 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used2.50 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width1.2 inches    (convert)
Height9.5 inches    (convert)
Length6.6 inches    (convert)
Weight21.76 ounces    (convert)
AuthorJay Bahadur
Page Count320
BindingHardcover
Published07/19/2011
Long DescriptionSomalia, on the tip of the Horn of Africa, has been inhabited as far back as 9,000 BC. Its history is as rich as the country is old. Caught up in a decades-long civil war, Somalia, along with Iraq and Afghanistan, has become one of the most dangerous countries in the world. Getting there from North America is a forty-five-hour, five-flight voyage through Frankfurt, Dubai, Djibouti, Bossaso (on the Gulf of Aden), and, finally, Galkayo. Somalia is a place where a government has been built out of anarchy.   For centuries, stories of pirates have captured imaginations around the world. The recent bands of daring, ragtag pirates off the coast of Somalia, hijacking multimillion-dollar tankers owned by international shipping conglomerates, have brought the scourge of piracy into the modern era.   The capture of the American-crewed cargo ship Maersk Alabama in April 2009, the first United States ship to be hijacked in almost two centuries, catapulted the Somali pirates onto prime-time news. Then, with the horrific killing by Somali pirates of four Americans, two of whom had built their dream yacht and were sailing around the world (“And now on to: Angkor Wat! And Burma!” they had written to friends), the United States Navy, Special Operation Forces, FBI, Justice Department, and the world’s military forces were put on notice: the Somali seas were now the most perilous in the world.   Jay Bahadur, a journalist who dared to make his way into the remote pirate havens of Africa’s easternmost country and spend months infiltrating their lives, gives us the first close-up look at the hidden world of the pirates of war-ravaged Somalia.   Bahadur’s riveting narrative exposé—the first ever—looks at who these men are, how they live, the forces that created piracy in Somalia, how the pirates spend the ransom money, how they deal with their hostages. Bahadur makes sense of the complex and fraught regional politics, the history of Somalia and the self-governing region of Puntland (an autonomous region in northeast Somalia), and the various catastrophic occurrences that have shaped their pirate destinies. The book looks at how the unrecognized mini-state of Puntland is dealing with the rise—and increasing sophistication—of piracy and how, through legal and military action, other nations, international shippers, the United Nations, and various international bodies are attempting to cope with the present danger and growing pirate crisis. A revelation of a world at the epicenter of political and natural disaster.
Similar Items9780743253390: The Looming Tower: Al-Qaeda And The Road To 9/11
9780718143992: Impossible Odds: The Kidnapping Of Jessica Buchanan And Her Dramatic Rescue By Seal Team Six
9780708904602: Impossible Odds: The Kidnapping Of Jessica Buchanan And Her Dramatic Rescue By Seal Team Six
9780609609873: See No Evil: The True Story Of A Ground Soldier In The Cia's War On Terrorism
9780582900547: The Way Of The Knife: The Cia, A Secret Army, And A War At The Ends Of The Earth
9780436294006: The World's Most Dangerous Place: Inside The Outlaw State Of Somalia
9780415225274: Impossible Odds: The Kidnapping Of Jessica Buchanan And Her Dramatic Rescue By Seal Team Six
9780385534185: The Triple Agent: The Al-Qaeda Mole Who Infiltrated The Cia
9780306821172: The World's Most Dangerous Place: Inside The Outlaw State Of Somalia
9780231126984: Pirate State: Inside Somalia's Terrorism At Sea
View 19 more similar items
Created02-28-2013 9:59:12am
Modified04-30-2020 5:52:43pm
MD58a65b3543f4d7d7aa5c149d4d9a9720f
SHA256a8bb0f9bc371276c428b014b0cdef6016c6d5c137b70dd00bdfa107321382f5c
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0195398

Article of interest

We have been asked a few times why we put a delay on the free data feed access and why someone should pay for the fast data feed access instead of just using the free version.

Put simply, the free data feed is inteded for you to use while testing your application or if you have a very low lookup requirement. You can even use the free version in production if you don't mind the forced delay in getting your databack. But if you need high volume or need fast data lookups all day long, you really do need to pay for a subscription.

The free version of the data feed will deliver a limited number of lookups each day at full speed and at no charge. Just like manual lookups, every user gets this limited number of fast lookups. Unlike manual lookups though, if you lookup the same data more than once with your data feed, it still counts as a lookup and one of your free lookups gets used. Manual lookups get repeat lookups for free. Why? Because the user gets to see our ads again and might click on one to earn us a small amount of money. You don't think we run this site for free do you?

With a subscription, all of your data feed lookups are fast no matter how many you execute in a day. Repeat lookups of the same item still count as a new lookup, but they are still just as fast as all the others. We try to optomize the data feed lookups for the subscribers to deliver the highest speed of data delivery as we can.

We have run some tests under simulated conditions using multiple computers but all using the same account. Each computer was on a separate network with its own route into our server. We did this to see variations in access time and how many lookups could be performed in a day. Each computer in the test hammered our site trying to grab unique data lookups as quickly as possible. To make this work we gave each computer a list of known codes that we knew would return valid data.

On the average, each computer in the test could perform a large number of lookups in a 24 hour period. Although each computer had different results based on the network, time of day and load on our server, over all they were all fairly close.

When in FREE  mode, they were able to average 18,000 lookups in a 24 hour period.

When in SUBSCRIPTION mode, they were able to average 129,600 lookps in a 24 hour period.

Our server processed an average of 1,684,800 lookup request during each 24 hour period while testing which is many times higher than our normal daily load. We really torchered the server to see what it could do.

You can see from these numbers that we have the ability to deliver a large amount of data. One of the largest factors in delivering the data is the network communication speed. Due to standard delays in communication, it often takes longer to ask for the data than it does for us to lookup the informaiton.

You should also quickly notice that in FREE mode, the system does a very good job of limiting how many lookups can be done. This is done by forcing a pause between the data request and returning the data to the calling application once the fast lookups are used up. And if you are asking yourself why we would force this type of delay, well it should be clear. We need to make money. It costs money and takes time to keep this site running. If you are making a lot of requests for our data, it is probably because you are trying to make money with your app so why should we not also make some money on the deal? Data feeds don't generate any ad revenue so we have to charge another way.

On the data feed page you can learn more about how the feed works and purchase a subscription if you like. 

Close

Search

Close

Share

Close

Dialog