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EAN-139780300113150   EAN-13 barcode 9780300113150
Product NameThe Problem Of Slavery As History: A Global Approach (The David Brion Davis Series)
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionHardcover, 2006
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0300113153
SKUXX-012-35-1531301
Price New27.90 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used27.90 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width6.1 inches    (convert)
Height0.8 inches    (convert)
Length9.2 inches    (convert)
Weight12.64 ounces    (convert)
AuthorJoseph C. Miller
Page Count240
BindingPaperback
Published12/31/2009
Long DescriptionWhy did slavery—an accepted evil for thousands of years—suddenly become regarded during the eighteenth century as an abomination so compelling that Western governments took up the cause of abolition in ways that transformed the modern world? Joseph C. Miller turns this classic question on its head by rethinking the very nature of slavery, arguing that it must be viewed generally as a process rather than as an institution. Tracing the global history of slaving over thousands of years, Miller reveals the shortcomings of Western narratives that define slavery by the same structures and power relations regardless of places and times, concluding instead that slaving is a process which can be understood fully only as imbedded in changing circumstances.
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SHA2569ef9aedc5227eeff1cca61401c6d5cc8b1befa8e0de3aad1da9e5dadd921581d
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Article of interest

This describes how to use version 3.x of the data feed. Version 2.x of the feed is still supported. Version 1.x of the feed is no longer supported in any way.

IMPORTANT: Starting with version 3.2, we have a new property and a new way of dealing with product images. Read about it here.

Accessing the data requires your account to have an active data feed. This switch can be turned on or off on the data feed page. This is also where you will be able to view your KEYCODE which is required to make calls to the feed.

Main changes from version 2.x to 3.x include (but not limited to)...

Calls to the data feed are made via HTTP GET or HTTP POST requests. There are only a few required parameters when making a call.

Most other parameters are optional and they will alter the way data is returned to you and how your request is processed. You can also pass in your own values that you need carried through. Any parameter that the system doesn't recognize will be returned AS-IS in the status block. This can be handy in situations where you are pulling the data in an asyncronus manor and need extra information passed into your callback routine.

When performing a lookup...

When updating data...

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There are some special "get" operations that need no other parameters. You would not use "find" or "update" when using these. Only use the "keycode", "mode" and "get" for these items. These operations are important because many of our elements are data driven and that data changes over time. We normally don't remove attributes or categories but we do often add to the collection.

The returned data can come back in JSON or XML format. In either case the structure of the data is the same. Because it is easier to read, we will be using XML to demonstrate the layout of the result. Here is the data layout. Notice that this is a complex object and some elements have child elements and some elements may be arrays with repeating content.

The easiest way to get the feel of the data is to make several requests using your web browser and ask for the data in XML format. Although JSON is often easier to work with in code, the XML output is often easier for people to read because of the nice markup tags that wrap around each element and the web browser will usually do a nice job of indenting to make it clear which elements are stored within other elements.

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