Image
EAN-139780227173398   EAN-13 barcode 9780227173398
Product NameFrom Aldersgate To Azusa Street: Wesleyan, Holiness, And Pentecostal Visions Of The New Creation
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionPaperback
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 1606089889
SKUACOMMP2_BOOK_USEDGOOD_0227173392
Price New44.00 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used39.96 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width0.87 inches    (convert)
Height9 inches    (convert)
Length6 inches    (convert)
Weight19.04 ounces    (convert)
AuthorHenry H., Iii Knight
Page Count382
BindingPaperback
Published08/11/2010
Features
  • ISBN: 9781606089880
  • Condition: New
  • Notes: 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Tracking provided on most orders. Buy with Confidence! Millions of books sold!
Long DescriptionHistorians have noted the connections between the Wesleyan Methodist movement that began in the eighteenth century, the emergence of African American Methodist traditions and an interdenominational Holiness movement in the nineteenth century, and the birth of Pentecostalism in the twentieth century. This volume, written by historians, theologians, and pastors, builds on that earlier work. The contributors present a diverse array of key figures-denominational leaders and mavericks, institutional loyalists and come--outers, clergy and laity--who embodied these movements. The authors show that in spite of their differing historical and cultural contexts, these movements constitute a distinct theological family whose confident and expectant faith in the transforming power of God has significant implications for the renewal of the contemporary church and its faithfulness to God's mission in the world today. Contributors Corky Alexander Estrelda Alexander Kimberly Ervin Alexander Leslie D. Callahan Barry L. Callen Douglas R. Cullum Dennis C. Dickerson D. William Faupel Philip Hamner David Aaron Johnson J. C. Kelley Henry H. Knight III William C. Kostlevy Diane K. Leclerc Joshua J. McMullen Rodney McNeall Stephen W. Rankin Harold E. Raser Douglas M. Strong Matthew K. Thompson Wallace Thornton Jr. L. F. Thuston Arlene Sanchez Walsh Steven J. Land Laura Guy John H. Wigger
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Article of interest

This symbology was developed by the MSI Data Corporation and is based on the Plessey Code symbology. MSI is most often used in warehouses and inventory control.

This is a continuous non-self-checking symbology meaning it has no predetermined length and there is no validation built into the barcode itself. If you want to validate the data stored in the barcode, you would need to use a check digit. Mod 10 is the most common check digit used with MSI but you can also use mod 1010 or mod 1110. It is allowed but generally not a good idea to omit the check digit all together.

There is a start marker which is represented by three binary digits 110 (where 1 is black and 0 is white). There is also a stop marker which is represented by four binary digits 1001. The remaining markers represent the numeric digits 0-9 (no text or special characters) and each digit is represented by twelve binary digits. Below is a table that describes all of the possible markers. The start and stop markers are the main difference between MSI and Plessey. That and the fact that MSI only covers digits 0-9. You can read these stripes as a binary values where 110 is binary 1 and 100 is binary 0. The stop marker simply has an extra bit on the end.

Character Stripe Bits Binary Value
START 110 1
0 100100100100 0000
1 100100100110 0001
2 100100110100 0010
3 100100110110 0011
4 100110100100 0100
5 100110100110 0101
6 100110110100 0110
7 100110110110 0111
8  110100100100 1000
9  110100100110 1001
STOP 1001 0 + extra stripe

 To create a graphical barcode using this process, you can simply string together a series of 1 and 0 graphic images once you have calculated what your barcode should look like using the table shown above. You can view the source code of this page if you want to see how we created the example shown below.

Code [start]375[stop]
Bits: 110 100100110110 100110110110 100110100110 1001
Graphic:

This is just an example of one way to perform the graphic encoding. It is often easier to just draw the lines instead of tacking together individual images. If you would like to create free MSI barcodes, please visit our barcode generator page. You can save the images you make and use them as needed.

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