Image
EAN-139780199922833   EAN-13 barcode 9780199922833
Product NameThe Diary of Antera Duke, an Eighteenth-Century African Slave Trader
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionHeight:9.25 inches / Length:0.71 inches / Weight:1 pounds / Width:6.26 inches
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0199922837
SKU539586
Price New10.59 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used6.56 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width0.8 inches    (convert)
Height6.1 inches    (convert)
Length9.1 inches    (convert)
Weight16 ounces    (convert)
AuthorStephen D. Behrendt, A.J.H. Latham, David Northrup
Page Count314
BindingPaperback
Published07/12/2012
FeaturesUsed Book in Good Condition
Long DescriptionIn his diary, Antera Duke (ca.1735-ca.1809) wrote the only surviving eyewitness account of the slave trade by an African merchant. A leader in late eighteenth-century Old Calabar, a cluster of Efik-speaking communities in the Cross River region, he resided in Duke Town, forty-five miles from the Atlantic Ocean in what is now southeast Nigeria. His diary, written in trade English from 1785 to 1788, is a candid account of daily life in an African community at the height of Calabar's overseas commerce. It provides valuable information on Old Calabar's economic activity both with other African businessmen and with European ship captains who arrived to trade for slaves, produce, and provisions. This new edition of Antera's diary, the first in fifty years, draws on the latest scholarship to place the diary in its historical context. Introductory essays set the stage for the Old Calabar of Antera Duke's lifetime, explore the range of trades, from slaves to produce, in which he rose to prominence, and follow Antera on trading missions across an extensive commercial hinterland. The essays trace the settlement and development of the towns that comprised Old Calabar and survey the community's social and political structure, rivalries among families, sacrifices of slaves, and witchcraft ordeals. This edition reproduces Antera's original trade-English diary with a translation into standard English on facing pages, along with extensive annotation. The Diary of Antera Duke furnishes a uniquely valuable source for the history of precolonial Nigeria and the Atlantic slave trade, and this new edition enriches our understanding of it.
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Article of interest

ISBN stands for International Standard Book Number. Originally this was a 10 digit number known as ISBN-10, but has been replaced with a 13 digit version known as ISBN-13 (aka EAN-13) to better fit in with the industry standard product numbering system.

The ISBN system offers a unique numbering system for books and publications of various types. ISBN offers 9 identification digits for each book or publication and one check digit. ISBN-13 expands the available number set by doubling the available numbers. You might think that the extra three digits would more than double the available numbers but ISBN is limited within the EAN-13 numbering system and will always start with 978 or 979 as the first three digits, leaving only 9 more digits for the actual identification digits and again the last digit is the check digit.

Any ISBN-10 number can be converted to ISBN-13. Any ISBN-13 number that starts with 978 can be converted back to ISBN-10. ISBN-13 numbers that start with 979 cannot be converted to ISBN-10.

The conversion process from ISBN-10 to ISBN-13 is a rather simple one. Start with the first 9 digits of the ISBN-10 number, place 978 in front and calculate the new check digit using the standard EAN check digit calculation.

If you want to calculate the check digit for ISBN-10, that is done using a MOD-11 calculation that is very different than the EAN check digit process.

ISBN-1-5905-9332-4

Look at the number above and below the barcode. You will see that except for the last digit in the ISBN number, all of the digits exist in the 13 digit version shown under the barcode right after the 978 and just before the new check digit of 5.

Now you can see how easy it is to convert between ISBN-10 and ISBN-13.

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