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EAN-139780060904197   EAN-13 barcode 9780060904197
Product NameThe Shallows: What The Internet Is Doing To Our Brains
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionPaperback
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0393339750
SKUSN-06302012-00450
Price New6.34 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used2.74 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width0.8 inches    (convert)
Height8.3 inches    (convert)
Length5.5 inches    (convert)
Weight10.56 ounces    (convert)
AuthorNicholas Carr
Page Count304
BindingPaperback
Published06/06/2011
FeaturesFinalist for the Pulitzer Prize
Long Description

Finalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction: “Nicholas Carr has written a Silent Spring for the literary mind.”―Michael Agger, Slate

“Is Google making us stupid?” When Nicholas Carr posed that question, in a celebrated Atlantic Monthly cover story, he tapped into a well of anxiety about how the Internet is changing us. He also crystallized one of the most important debates of our time: As we enjoy the Net’s bounties, are we sacrificing our ability to read and think deeply?

Now, Carr expands his argument into the most compelling exploration of the Internet’s intellectual and cultural consequences yet published. As he describes how human thought has been shaped through the centuries by “tools of the mind”―from the alphabet to maps, to the printing press, the clock, and the computer―Carr interweaves a fascinating account of recent discoveries in neuroscience by such pioneers as Michael Merzenich and Eric Kandel. Our brains, the historical and scientific evidence reveals, change in response to our experiences. The technologies we use to find, store, and share information can literally reroute our neural pathways.

Building on the insights of thinkers from Plato to McLuhan, Carr makes a convincing case that every information technology carries an intellectual ethic―a set of assumptions about the nature of knowledge and intelligence. He explains how the printed book served to focus our attention, promoting deep and creative thought. In stark contrast, the Internet encourages the rapid, distracted sampling of small bits of information from many sources. Its ethic is that of the industrialist, an ethic of speed and efficiency, of optimized production and consumption―and now the Net is remaking us in its own image. We are becoming ever more adept at scanning and skimming, but what we are losing is our capacity for concentration, contemplation, and reflection.

Part intellectual history, part popular science, and part cultural criticism, The Shallows sparkles with memorable vignettes―Friedrich Nietzsche wrestling with a typewriter, Sigmund Freud dissecting the brains of sea creatures, Nathaniel Hawthorne contemplating the thunderous approach of a steam locomotive―even as it plumbs profound questions about the state of our modern psyche. This is a book that will forever alter the way we think about media and our minds.
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QR Codes are a type of 2 dimentional (2D) barcode that are commonly used in advertising and supported by most smart phones. These compact codes can make it very easy to get digital data from print into a computer or smart phone.

Originally created for the automotive industry, these codes have exploded into use in print on business cards, in magazines and even seen on web sites. This is because of the increased access to smart phones that can easily scan these codes and transfer the data to the user.

There are a number of uses for these codes. Web links, contact information (vCard) and other useful types of information. Here is an example of a QR Code that you can scan.

Barcode QR Code

The large square patterns you see in three corners of the image are used for positioning. The smaller box you can see in the lower right portion of the image is used for alignment. Connecting the positioning blocks are a series of timing blocks which always alternate light/dark (0/1).This allows the scanning device to recognize and scan regardless of how the pattern is oriented. To make this easier to identify, here is a colored version of the same QR Code with the positioning blocks marked in red, the alignment block is marked in yellow and the timing marks are marked in green.

Barcode QR Code

There are also sections for versioning and formatting which are kept around the positioning blocks. In the image below, the formatting blocks are marked in red and the versioning blocks are marked in yellow.

Barcode QR Code

The remaining blocks make up the content information and associated error correction data. As the amount of data grows, more alignment markers are inserted into the image. It is important to print the image in a large enough size. If the image is too small or too dense, scanners could have trouble reading the data back.

If you would like to create your own QR Codes, there are several web sites that let you do this. We actually have our own QR Code generator on this site where you can create your very own QR Codes for any use you like and it is totally FREE!

Create your own QR Codes

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