Image
EAN-139780060186395   EAN-13 barcode 9780060186395
Product NameThe Shallows: What The Internet Is Doing To Our Brains
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Short DescriptionHardcover
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ 0393072223
SKU00-037
Price New7.98 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used2.00 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width1 inches    (convert)
Height9.6 inches    (convert)
Length6.5 inches    (convert)
Weight19.52 ounces    (convert)
AuthorNicholas Carr
Page Count288
BindingHardcover
Published06/07/2010
Long DescriptionFinalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction: “Nicholas Carr has written a Silent Spring for the literary mind.”―Michael Agger, Slate Finalist for the 2011 PEN Center USA Literary Award “Is Google making us stupid?” When Nicholas Carr posed that question, in a celebrated Atlantic Monthly cover story, he tapped into a well of anxiety about how the Internet is changing us. He also crystallized one of the most important debates of our time: As we enjoy the Net’s bounties, are we sacrificing our ability to read and think deeply? Now, Carr expands his argument into the most compelling exploration of the Internet’s intellectual and cultural consequences yet published. As he describes how human thought has been shaped through the centuries by “tools of the mind”―from the alphabet to maps, to the printing press, the clock, and the computer―Carr interweaves a fascinating account of recent discoveries in neuroscience by such pioneers as Michael Merzenich and Eric Kandel. Our brains, the historical and scientific evidence reveals, change in response to our experiences. The technologies we use to find, store, and share information can literally reroute our neural pathways. Building on the insights of thinkers from Plato to McLuhan, Carr makes a convincing case that every information technology carries an intellectual ethic―a set of assumptions about the nature of knowledge and intelligence. He explains how the printed book served to focus our attention, promoting deep and creative thought. In stark contrast, the Internet encourages the rapid, distracted sampling of small bits of information from many sources. Its ethic is that of the industrialist, an ethic of speed and efficiency, of optimized production and consumption―and now the Net is remaking us in its own image. We are becoming ever more adept at scanning and skimming, but what we are losing is our capacity for concentration, contemplation, and reflection. Part intellectual history, part popular science, and part cultural criticism, The Shallows sparkles with memorable vignettes―Friedrich Nietzsche wrestling with a typewriter, Sigmund Freud dissecting the brains of sea creatures, Nathaniel Hawthorne contemplating the thunderous approach of a steam locomotive―even as it plumbs profound questions about the state of our modern psyche. This is a book that will forever alter the way we think about media and our minds.
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Created02-26-2012 6:33:44pm
Modified04-30-2020 2:56:50pm
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SHA2563b13d7c4ebd5e0e158aad45a892b9d7773383554be085a560c1561b3d8c02458
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Article of interest

The extra items are numerically indexed and provide extra text to go along with numeric values such as weights or distances or even currencies. The attributes that use these extra indexes are all numeric and take two fields. You can send the data in a single field as long as you use the same short or long text that we keep in our database.

Although the data feed API can deliver information as JSON or XML, we are using XML here because it is easier to read.

<attribute>
   <extra_group>Distance</extra_group>
   <field_name>depth</field_name>
   <extra>
      <id>501</id>
      <extra_short>in</extra_short>
      <extra_long>inches</extra_long>
      <seq>10</seq>
   </extra>
   <extra>
      <id>503</id>
      <extra_short>ft</extra_short>
      <extra_long>feet</extra_long>
      <seq>20</seq>
   </extra>
   <extra>
      <id>505</id>
      <extra_short>yrd</extra_short>
      <extra_long>yards</extra_long>
      <seq>30</seq>
   </extra>
</attribute>

Looking at this example, you can see that the EXTRA portion is an array of values each with their own properties. Here is what each section means:

This extra information is normally used in a drop down box next to the numeric data field that we want to enhance. Some examples might be:

You see we can display the long or short version of the extra code by using the ID index.

Fields that make use of this extra information require it when pushing data back to us in the feed. You can either send the data in two fields (value and extra_id) or in a single field (value) as long as the text following the numeric portion matches the long or short version of the extra data we store for the field.

For example, if you wanted to update a field that represented distance with the value "100 yards", you could either send that data just like that in the value field value=100+yards or in two seperate fields value=100&extra_id=505 and you would get the same results. If you send an invalid extra_id or text after the number that doesn't match our accepted list, your update would be rejected.

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