Image
EAN-138580000039054   EAN-13 barcode 8580000039054
Product NameReforming Jim Crow: Southern Politics And State In The Age Before Brown
LanguageEnglish
CategoryBook / Magazine / Publication
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B008SLEFZ4
SKUZN210612/0002286
Price New10.72 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used6.04 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Width1.1 inches    (convert)
Height6.3 inches    (convert)
Length9.3 inches    (convert)
Weight22.4 ounces    (convert)
AuthorKimberley Johnson
Page Count336
BindingHardcover
Published04/16/2010
Long DescriptionHistorians of the Civil Rights era typically treat the key events of the 1950s Brown v. Board of Education , sit-ins, bus boycotts, and marches--as a revolutionary social upheaval that upended a rigid caste system. While the 1950s was a watershed era in Southern and civil rights history, the tendency has been to paint the preceding Jim Crow era as a brutal system that featured none of the progressive reform impulses so apparent at the federal level and in the North. As Kimberley Johnson shows in this pathbreaking reappraisal of the Jim Crow era, this argument is too simplistic, and is true to neither the 1950s nor the long era of Jim Crow that finally solidified in 1910. Focusing on the political development of the South between 1910 and 1954, Johnson considers the genuine efforts by white and black progressives to reform the system without destroying it. These reformers assumed that the system was there to stay, and therefore felt that they had to work within it in order to modernize the South. Consequently, white progressives tried to install a better--meaning more equitable--separate-but-equal system, and elite black reformers focused on ameliorative (rather than confrontational) solutions that would improve the lives of African Americans. Johnson concentrates on local and state reform efforts throughout the South in areas like schooling, housing, and labor. Many of the reforms made a difference, but they had the ironic impact of generating more demand for social change among blacks. She is able to show how demands slowly rose over time, and how the system laid the seeds of its own destruction. The reformers' commitment to a system that was less unequal--albeit not truly equal--and more like the North led to significant policy changes over time. As Johnson powerfully demonstrates, our lack of knowledge about the cumulative policy transformations resulting from the Jim Crow reform impulse impoverishes our understanding of the Civil Rights revolution. Reforming Jim Crow rectifies that.
Similar Items9780300121322: Fear Itself: The New Deal And The Origins Of Our Time
9780300117264: Fear Itself: The New Deal And The Origins Of Our Time
9780300069303: Fear Itself: The New Deal And The Origins Of Our Time
9780226080284: Fear Itself: The New Deal And The Origins Of Our Time
9780195157024: Fear Itself: The New Deal And The Origins Of Our Time
9780091796068: Fear Itself: The New Deal And The Origins Of Our Time
9780870494352: Southern Politics In State And Nation
9780700618477: Plessy V. Ferguson: Race And Inequality In Jim Crow America (Landmark Law Cases And American Society)
9780700615032: Dred Scott And The Politics Of Slavery (Landmark Law Cases & American Society)
9780700612192: Race and Redistricting: The Shaw-Cromartie Cases (Landmark Law Cases and American Society) (Landmark Law Cases & American Society)
View 34 more similar items
Created03-04-2013 1:38:04pm
Modified04-30-2020 1:51:43pm
MD5922835ee8605ede2385d4ae85b94fd49
SHA256fc489e5706dd581b6bc0cbc586c50cd9fec537c45ab054194a51e440fdc60f20
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0215390

Article of interest

This symbology was originally designed to be easily scanned even when printed on dot-matrix printers or on multi-ply paper such as receipts, invioces and alike. Codabar is being replaced by newer symbol sets that store more data in a smaller area but there is already a large install base where these codes are currently being used.

 

Codabar uses 4 bars and 3 spaces to encode each character. A narrow space is used between characters. The characters that can be encoded using codabar are the digits 0-9 and the characters $ (dollar sign) - (dash) + (plus) : (colon) / (slash) . (period). There are also 4 start/stop characters represented by A, B, C, D or possibly T, N, * (asterisk), E. These start and stop characters are not represented as data just like other barcodes.

Using the 16 different variations of start and stop characters make it possible to identify some applications of the barcode. For example FedEx tracking numbers start with C and end with D while library barcodes start with A and end with B. This doesn't always hold true because there are so many applications of these numbers but this can be a guide to help identify how the barcode is being used.

If you want to make your own Codabar barcode, please visit our barcode generator page. Save the images you create and use them how ever you like.

Close

Search

Close

Share