Image
EAN-135050070020304   EAN-13 barcode 5050070020304
Product NameThe Horse Soldiers
LanguageEnglish
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B00015N588
Model10001030
Price New5.15 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used4.23 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Aspect Ratio1.78:1
CastJohn Wayne, William Holden, Constance Towers, Judson Pratt, Hoot Gibson
BindingDvd
FormatPAL
Run Time120 minutes
Long DescriptionA crisp retelling of a true-life episode from the Civil War, The Horse Soldiers is a latter-day sorta-Western from John Ford, falling midway between The Searchers (1956) and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962). In 1863 a Union colonel named Grierson (Marlowe in the film, and John Wayne by any name) led his cavalry several hundred miles behind Confederate lines to cut the railway track between Newton Station and soon-to-be-embattled Vicksburg. Grierson's raid was as successful as it was daring, and remarkably bloodless. Never fear that the screenplay makes up for that un-Hollywood lapse--as well as supplying amatory distraction for the colonel in the form of a feisty Southern belle (Constance Towers) who has to be dragged along to protect secrecy. There's a certain amount of bombast in the running arguments about wartime ethics between Marlowe and the new regimental surgeon (William Holden), who don't take to each other at all. But Ford more than makes up for it with such tasty scenes as an encounter with a couple of redneck Rebel deserters (Denver Pyle and Strother Martin), an ethereal swamp crossing led by a cornpone deacon (Hank Worden), and above all the famous skirmish with a hillside full of young cadets from a venerable military academy. The film ends rather abruptly because Ford abandoned a climactic battle scene--the veteran stunt man and bit player Fred Kennedy having been killed in a horse-fall. Golden-age cowboy star Hoot Gibson, who acted in Ford's directorial debut, Straight Shooting (1917), appears as Sergeant Brown. --Richard T. Jameson, Amazon.com
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Created05-13-2016 9:39:30pm
Modified10-09-2017 6:27:19pm
MD5ebd6d8fbe1d75193a02c46e4aacf328c
SHA2567bbe744f85248590f9944cb7e1607d896e16141d3103e8deb4e74a070d217a3d
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0357289

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We have been asked a few times why we put a delay on the free data feed access and why someone should pay for the fast data feed access instead of just using the free version.

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The free version of the data feed will deliver a limited number of lookups each day at full speed and at no charge. Just like manual lookups, every user gets this limited number of fast lookups. Unlike manual lookups though, if you lookup the same data more than once with your data feed, it still counts as a lookup and one of your free lookups gets used. Manual lookups get repeat lookups for free. Why? Because the user gets to see our ads again and might click on one to earn us a small amount of money. You don't think we run this site for free do you?

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Our server processed an average of 1,684,800 lookup request during each 24 hour period while testing which is many times higher than our normal daily load. We really torchered the server to see what it could do.

You can see from these numbers that we have the ability to deliver a large amount of data. One of the largest factors in delivering the data is the network communication speed. Due to standard delays in communication, it often takes longer to ask for the data than it does for us to lookup the informaiton.

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