Image
EAN-135039036036733   EAN-13 barcode 5039036036733
Product NameWaitress [Import anglais]
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B0012OTRNY
Model3665701000
Price New9.39 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used0.98 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Aspect Ratio1.85:1
CastKeri Russell, Nathan Fillion, Cheryl Hines, Jeremy Sisto, Andy Griffith
GenreFANTASY
BindingDvd
FormatPAL
Run Time108 unknown-units
Long DescriptionUK Released DVD/Blu-Ray item. It MAY NOT play on regular US DVD/Blu-Ray player. You may need a multi-region US DVD/Blu-Ray player to play this item. Much like the films of Hal Hartley, Waitress is funny in a deadpan sort of way, but a sadness lurks below the surface. After making a splash in Hartley's The Unbelievable Truth and Trust, Adrienne Shelly turned to directing with Sudden Manhattan and I'll Take You There. Set in a small Southern town, her third picture revolves around waitress Jenna (Felicity's radiant Keri Russell), who works at Joe's Pie Diner (Joe is played by Andy Griffith). Jenna is the pastry genius who makes Joe's joint shine. Her co-workers include the forthright Becky (Cheryl Hines, Curb Your Enthusiasm) and insecure Dawn (Shelly). All three have man trouble, but Jenna has it the worst. Her husband, Earl (Jeremy Sisto, Six Feet Under), treats her like a piece of property. When she finds out she's pregnant, Jenna fears she'll be stuck with him forever. Then, she develops a crush on her married obstetrician, Dr. Pomatter (Nathan Fillion, Serenity). With the aid of her fanciful confections, like peachy keen tarts, their flirtation develops into a full-blown affair. It appears to be a no-win situation, but Shelly finds an empowering way to bring this bittersweet story to a close. If the candy-coloured conclusion plays more like fantasy than reality, it's a fantasy worth embracing. Sadly, Shelly was murdered before Waitress ever saw the light of day (leaving behind a husband and child of her own). Fortunately, her final film is far more life-affirming than morose, although it does end with the word "goodbye." --Kathleen C. Fennessy
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Created08-27-2016 4:17:42am
Modified03-07-2018 4:01:43pm
MD53cff7d607650da41537df99da6b82ded
SHA2569c016697c44c793797f2fd8eabdf544c79be0997e034dc1d6b7ad01384311b51
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0063040

Here we will demonstrate the most basic example of importing the CSV data files that we produce on this site into your MySQL database.

For information about various databases you can use and how to import CSV files into them, please view the overview article "Importing CSV data into your database".

For this example, we are going to import the product data CSV file out of the sample_ean_data.zip but this same process will work on the full data download file. We will also be executing the commands in the MySQL Workbench but you can also use the command line tool with the same commands if you like.

First, start by creating a blank table. Use the table layout described in the read_me file for the most up-to-date table layout. It is suggested that you not use any indexing at this point. You can add indexes later. It is most likely that you will have your own tables where you want to store your data so importing the CSV files can be done into temporary tables and then later copied over to your tables. Leaving off the indexes and constraints on these import tables reduces the risk of import errors. Here is an example:

create table ean_product
(
    EAN13             varchar(13),
    UPCA              varchar(12),
    UPCE              varchar(8),
    SKU               varchar(200),
    PriceNew          numeric(15,2),
    PriceUsed         numeric(15,2),
    PriceDate         date,
    company           varchar(13),
    product           varchar(100),
    description       varchar(100),
    category          int,
    url               varchar(500),
    created           datetime,
    modified          datetime
);

Next we perform the import using the LOAD DATA INFILE command. The path to the file depends on where you saved the data and which operating system you are on. For Windows users you might find your file on the C: drive and Linux users may find your date in your home (~) folder. This example shows a Linux import. Only the path would be different between the operating systems.

LOAD DATA LOCAL
    INFILE '~/sample_ean_data/sample_ean_product.csv' 
    INTO TABLE ean_product
    FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' ENCLOSED BY '"' ESCAPED BY '\\'
    LINES TERMINATED BY '\r\n'
    IGNORE 1 LINES;

Finally, lets look at the data that we just imported.

SELECT * FROM EAN_PRODUCT;

You may have seen some warnings after the import command. If you are concerned about these warnings, examine the data. It could be that some data has grown beyond the size specified in the read_me file. If you are worried, make the fields larger and try the process again after deleting all of the data out of the table.

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