Image
EAN-135035822015630   EAN-13 barcode 5035822015630
Product NameThe Mouse That Roared (Region 2)
LanguageEnglish
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B0000695JU
Price New4.40 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used3.55 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Aspect Ratio1.85:1
CastPeter Sellers, Jean Seberg, William Hartnell, David Kossoff, Leo McKern
GenreMILITARY & WAR
BindingDvd
FormatPAL
Run Time83 minutes
Long DescriptionUK Released DVD/Blu-Ray item. It MAY NOT play on regular US DVD/Blu-Ray player. You may need a multi-region US DVD/Blu-Ray player to play this item. The Mouse That Roared, originally released in 1959, is mostly remembered as a tour-de-force from peerless comic actor Peter Sellers, playing all three of the principal roles. It's worth seeing for that alone, but the film is also one of the most memorable satires of nuclear geopolitics produced during the Cold War and, along with another Sellers vehicle, Dr Strangelove, provides an unbeatable illustration of the paranoia and helplessness engendered by that period. The Mouse That Roared tells the story of the fictional European principality of Grand Fenwick. Finding itself on the wrong end of a trade dispute with the United States, and noting America's generosity in rebuilding the countries it had fought in World War II, Grand Fenwick's rulers hit upon the idea of declaring war on the US, losing, and then reaping a Marshall Plan-style hand-out. The plan, proposed by Grand Fenwick's prime minister (played by Peter Sellers), is approved by the monarch (also played by Peter Sellers), who dispatches an invasion force of chain mail-clad archers under the command of Grand Fenwick's hapless Field Marshal (also played by Peter Sellers). Due to a series of happenstances and misunderstandings, Grand Fenwick's plan goes terribly wrong, and they inflict a surprising defeat on America, with curious consequences. On the DVD: The Mouse That Roared is presented in 1.85:1 widescreen; sound is mono. Soundtracks are available in English, French, German, Italian and Spanish, and subtitles in all those as well as most other major European languages, Hebrew and Arabic. Special features include a scene selector, and three theatrical trailers: one for this film (English audiences will get a kick out of the 1950s American announcer raving about "an hilarious new personality, Peter Sellers"), on
Similar Items9780790765341: Great Race
9780767863728: Dr. Strangelove, Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
9780316938723: The Mouse That Roared
0883929043521: Being There [Blu-Ray]
0883929037094: Being There
0883316248782: Fiendish Plot Of Fu Manchu
0085391109129: Great Race Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon, Natalie Wood, Peter Falk, Keenan Wynn, Arthur O'Connell, Vivian Vance, Dorothy Provine, Larry Storch, Ross Martin
0043396368422: Wrong Box
0043396061873: Dr. Strangelove, Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
0027616902740: It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World
0027616855596: Mouse on the Moon
0024543112044: Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines
0012236102052: Peter Sellers 5 - Film Collection
0012236102045: Alec Guinness Collection
Created07-13-2010
Modified03-07-2018 4:01:24pm
MD58ee3aa7b52adf90db67763fbcfe972d7
SHA256e77d12359247def4a8f126775e4dc0d9721af14e306c9c47ce8283c72f193fd9
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0258920

Article of interest

You may have a need for your application to work with our databse. There are many steps in creating an application and the needs of each application can be very different. But the basic data movement contept is pretty much the same in every case.

First of all, your application shouldn't rely on our server. This might seem like a quick way to get your application up and running with little cost but in the end, your app will suffer because it will have to share computing time with every other app that is trying to access our data and network bandwidth. And if we change the way our data is delivered, you would have to re-deploy new copies of your app to every machine.

You should always have your application communicate with your own server. This way you control the format of the communication between your app and the data. And if we need to change our data format, you only need to make the change in the module between your server and our server. Your users running your app won't see any impact or loss of service while changes are made to the communication between your server and our server.

Application Data Diagram

This diagram demonstrates the basic data flow concept. Each device running your application would make requests (red) for data against your server. Your server would talk do your own database to find the needed information and return that information to the requesting devices. When you don't have the data in your database, your server makes a connection to our server requesting the needed information. Our server performs a lookup in our database and if we have the data we return it to your server.

Once you receive the data from our server, you need to store a copy in your database for the next time it is needed by your users. You also need to return the data to the requesting devices just as you would if you found the data in your database in the first place. Except for a slight delay in getting the data, your user shouldn't see any difference beween getting the data directly from your database or getting it from our database.

The odds are, if one user requests a peice of information from your server, another user will request that same information soon after. This is why you need to keep a copy of the data once you query it from our database. You don't want every user to encounter a delay when requesting the same bit of information.

If you are creating your application and database from scratch, there are a few ways to get started. The basic concept that we suggest is the lowest cost and most effective method that we have seen so far. Here are the basic steps you should follow...

 

  1. Create your own database with the information you want to track (few records are needed)
  2. Create your server aplication to control data flow on your system
  3. Create the interface between your server and ours using the data feed process. This can be done for FREE while you are developing. Once you go into production you MAY need to pay a fee to maintain fast data access. But if you feed data back to us you may be able to continue using the free feed. It depends on your actual need.
  4. Build your user application. This can be a phone app or something that is run from computers. Your user app is completly in your control and will talk to your server not ours.
  5. Test your app well. Make sure that when your server can't find the data in your database that it communicates with ours to get the answer.
  6. When your basic testing is done, you should load your database with an initial data load. You can get this data from our download page for a reasonable fee.
  7. Test some more!
  8. Release your app to the world and watch it go.

Althought the details involved in building your application and server and database are going to be different than what others might see, the basic concepts and steps will be similar as outlined here.

We have seen several app developers follow these basic steps with great success. We have also seen a few app developers try to take short cuts only to see their apps fail or strugle.

The key to a successful app is performance and easy maintenance. By creating your own server and keeping your own database you will have control over those aspects. It is much easier to set your application and communication structure up correctly from the start than it is to go back and rebuild it later.

Hopefully, this outline has been of value to you. Take some time to look around the rest of our site, check out our sample data and the data feed pages. Look at our statistics page. And if you still have questions, you are always welcome to ask.

 

Close

Search

Close

Share

Close

Dialog