Image
EAN-134000127200341   EAN-13 barcode 4000127200341
Product NameTown Hall Party October 11, 1958 & August 22, 1959
LanguageEnglish
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie
Short DescriptionDVD
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B00078JZO2
Price New16.49 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used19.99 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Aspect Ratio1.33:1
CastHank Snow, The Collins Kids, Lefty Frizzell
GenreCOUNTRY - GENERAL
Width5.75 inches    (convert)
Height0.53 inches    (convert)
Length7.75 inches    (convert)
Weight3.84 ounces    (convert)
BindingDvd
FormatMultiple Formats, Closed-captioned, Color, Import, NTSC
Run Time91 minutes
Long DescriptionTown Hall Party was California's largest country music barndance, running from early 1952 until early 1961. The show was broadcast every Saturday night from a theatre made up to look like an old barn in the Compton suburb of Los Angeles. Crowds numbering up to 2000 would fill the old Town Hall to see and hear the top country artists of the day. The first hour was broadcast live over KFI and reached a wider audience when NBC syndicated the show on radio. The broadcast was extended to three hours when KTTV-TV televised the show. Jay Stewart (who later hosted the TV quiz show 'Let's Make a Deal'), and Tex Ritter were the MCs and the house band featured a Who's Who of West Coast country music, including Joe Maphis, Merle Travis, Skeets McDonald, Johnny Bond and Tommy Duncan. This Town Hall Party broadcast on DVD features two separate shows: October 11, 1958 - Introduction by Jay Stewart / Johnny Bond and cast / Skeets McDonald / Joe Maphis & Rose Lee Maphis: Paper Of Pins / The Collins Kids / Billy Mize & Cliff Crofford / Hank Snow / Jimmy Pruett and others. August 22, 1959 - Introduction by Jay Stewart / The Collins Kids / Tex Ritter / Martha Carson / Billy Mize & Cliff Crofford / Larry Collins & Joe Maphis / Charlie Williams / Fiddlin' Kate / Lefty Frizzell / Charlie Williams talks to Billy Mize & Cliff Crofford / Jimmy Pruett and others.
Similar Items4000127200327: Town Hall Party November 15, 1958
4000127200303: Town Hall Party February 14, 1959
4000127200280: Town Hall Party November 29, 1958
4000127200273: Town Hall Party: November 6, 1954
0790052003073: Various Artists-Town Hall Party Feb 14 1959 (Dvd)
Created04-17-2012 7:43:47pm
Modified04-30-2020 10:44:28am
MD5920ba23b6ce42a63a998b79547ab48fc
SHA256fde03b6524dc2cfef4b6b2b612978dc12bea4943ab08a50c81a7f8522b4c12ec
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0144222

Article of interest

This symbology was developed by the MSI Data Corporation and is based on the Plessey Code symbology. MSI is most often used in warehouses and inventory control.

This is a continuous non-self-checking symbology meaning it has no predetermined length and there is no validation built into the barcode itself. If you want to validate the data stored in the barcode, you would need to use a check digit. Mod 10 is the most common check digit used with MSI but you can also use mod 1010 or mod 1110. It is allowed but generally not a good idea to omit the check digit all together.

There is a start marker which is represented by three binary digits 110 (where 1 is black and 0 is white). There is also a stop marker which is represented by four binary digits 1001. The remaining markers represent the numeric digits 0-9 (no text or special characters) and each digit is represented by twelve binary digits. Below is a table that describes all of the possible markers. The start and stop markers are the main difference between MSI and Plessey. That and the fact that MSI only covers digits 0-9. You can read these stripes as a binary values where 110 is binary 1 and 100 is binary 0. The stop marker simply has an extra bit on the end.

Character Stripe Bits Binary Value
START 110 1
0 100100100100 0000
1 100100100110 0001
2 100100110100 0010
3 100100110110 0011
4 100110100100 0100
5 100110100110 0101
6 100110110100 0110
7 100110110110 0111
8  110100100100 1000
9  110100100110 1001
STOP 1001 0 + extra stripe

 To create a graphical barcode using this process, you can simply string together a series of 1 and 0 graphic images once you have calculated what your barcode should look like using the table shown above. You can view the source code of this page if you want to see how we created the example shown below.

Code [start]375[stop]
Bits: 110 100100110110 100110110110 100110100110 1001
Graphic:

This is just an example of one way to perform the graphic encoding. It is often easier to just draw the lines instead of tacking together individual images. If you would like to create free MSI barcodes, please visit our barcode generator page. You can save the images you make and use them as needed.

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