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EAN-130883929075126   EAN-13 barcode 0883929075126
UPC-A883929075126   UPC-A barcode 883929075126
Product NameFringe Season 1
LanguageEnglish
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie / TV
Short DescriptionWeight:1 pounds
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B001C4CI8U
SKUDS84590
Model5458810
Price New19.94 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used7.82 US Dollars    (curriencies)
IMDbIMDb Link
Run Time1,028 minutes
Aspect Ratio1.78:1
CastAnna Torv, Blair Brown, Joshua Jackson, Kirk Acevedo, Lance Reddick
GenreDrama
Run Time1028 minutes
Width5.4 inches    (convert)
Height1 inches    (convert)
Length7.5 inches    (convert)
Weight70 hundredths pounds    (convert)
BindingDVD
FormatMultiple Formats, AC-3, Color, Dolby, Dubbed, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
Published09/06/2018
Run Time1,028 minutes
FeaturesDVD, Standard Edition, 16 X 9 FULL FRAME, Viva Multi-Disc (6-10), Multi Disc, Dolby Surround 5.1 - English Stereo 2.0 - Portuguese, Evolution: The Genesis of Fringe featurette - The creators of the show discuss how the series unfolded and the qualities that make it so unique Behind the Real Science of Fringe featurette - From teleportation to re-animation Fringe incorporates recent discoveries in science. Consulting experts and scientists who are the authorities in their field address the areas of science which are the inspiration for the show. A Massive Undertaking: The Making of Fringe (on select episodes) - An in-depth exploration of how select episodes came to be made: from the frozen far reaches of shooting the pilot in Toronto to the weekly challenges of bringing episodes to air The Casting of Fringe- The story as told by producers and cast of how Anna Torv Joshua Jackson John Noble and others came to be cast in the series. Fringe Visual Effects featurette - Goes deep into the creation of the shared dream state with some of the biggest VFX shots of the show. Dissected Files: Unaired Scenes Unusual Side Effects: Gag Reel Fringe: Deciphering the Scene Roberto Orci Production Diary Gene the Cow montage Three Full-Length Commentaries from writers/producers including J.J. Abrams Roberto Orci Alex Kurtman J.R. Orci David Goodman Bryan Burk Akiva Goldsman and Jeff Pinkner, Standard Edition
Long DescriptionTeleportation. Mind control. Invisibility. Astral projection. Mutation. Reanimation. Phenomena that exist on the Fringe of science unleash their strange powers in this thrilling series, co-created by J.J. Abrams (Lost, Alias), combining the grit of the police procedural with the excitement of the unknown. The story revolves around three unlikely colleagues – a beautiful young FBI agent, a brilliant scientist who’s spent the last 17 years in a mental institution and the scientist’s sardonic son – who investigate a series of bizarre deaths and disasters known as “the pattern.” Someone is using our world as an experimental lab. And all clues lead to Massive Dynamic, a shadowy global corporation that may be more powerful than any nation. DVD features: Evolution: The Genesis of Fringe featurette - The creators of the show discuss how the series unfolded and the qualities that make it so unique Behind the Real Science of Fringe featurette - From teleportation to re-animation, Fringe incorporates recent discoveries in science. Consulting experts and scientists who are the authorities in their field address the areas of science which are the inspiration for the show. A Massive Undertaking: The Making of Fringe (on select episodes) - An in-depth exploration of how select episodes came to be made: from the frozen far reaches of shooting the pilot in Toronto, to the weekly challenges of bringing episodes to air The Casting of Fringe- The story, as told by producers and cast, of how Anna Torv, Joshua Jackson, John Noble and others came to be cast in the series. Fringe Visual Effects featurette - Goes deep into the creation of the shared dream state with some of the biggest VFX shots of the show. Dissected Files: Unaired Scenes Unusual Side Effects: Gag Reel Fringe: Deciphering the Scene Roberto Orci Production Diary Gene the Cow montage Three Full-Length Commentaries from writers/producers, including J.J. Abrams, Roberto Orci, Alex
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Created09-17-2009
Modified04-30-2020 8:41:10am
MD568a1a64b854912f5e6b999a0ee780e20
SHA256436e8d4862050a3a02c2006f1b61cfa5e22d0ec83400357167f913be0e47179b
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Query Time0.0206552

Article of interest

Barcodes are a graphical representation of information that can be easily read by machines. People read text easy enough but machines find this to be too complex so we use barcodes to simplify the process.

Barcodes can store numbers, letters and all the special characters. What can be stored in the barcode depends on which type of barcode is being used. But the basics of how a barcode works is the same regardless of what type of code it is, what information is stored in the barcode or what type of scanner is being used.

barcode scanIt all starts with the scan. The scanner, regardless of which type you are using, will examine the barcode image. The lines (or blocks in the case of 2D barcodes) will either reflect or absorb light. When we look at the barcode, we tend to see the dark stripes and think of those as the important parts. Those are the parts that absorb the light and the white parts reflect the light. So the scanners tend to see the barcodes in reverse of how we think of them. But the dark and light portions of the code on their own don't automatically become the information stored in the code. In most cases, it is the relative placement and size of each dark and light stripe (or block) that make up the information. There are also special markers that help the scanner know which direction the barcode is facing when it is scanned. This allows the scanning process to work even if the barcode is upside down when it is scanned. The scanner simply processes the scanned data in reverse in this case.

barcode oscolloscopeTaking a look at an oscolloscope screen as a scanner passes over barcode, you can see that the stripes reflect back light and the scanner registers the changes as high and low levels. So what looks like a simple image is really a rather complex set of layered encryption to store the data. The encryption isn't done to hide the information in this case. Instead it is done to make it easy for the machine to read the information. Since the base language of machines is binary (1 and 0) it is easy for them to read this type of information even if it takes several steps to turn this back into something that people can understand.

binaryThe size of each high and low are combined to make binary data. A series of 1 (one) and 0 (zero) values which are strung together then decoded into the actual information. Up to this point, the process is the same for all barcodes regardless of how they are stored. Getting the lines or dots into binary is the easy part for the machine. The next step is to make this binary code into something useful to people. That step depends on  which type of barcode is being scanned. Each type of barcode has its own encoding methode. Just like human languages, what seems to be two similar words (or barcodes in this case) could actually be two very different values even though they have the same basic letters (or bars).

So you can see that the scanning devices need to know not only how to turn the bars or dots into binary, but after they have done that they need to know how to turn that binary string into the original information. But regardless of the encoding process the basic steps are the same. Process the light and dark areas, convert them to binary, decode the binary, pass the information on to the receiving device which is normally a computer program of some sort.

Once the decoded data reaches the computer program, there is no telling how the information is to be used. The grocery store will use the information to keep track of the products you purchased as you go through the register. A manufacturer will use the code to identify where they are storing their parts. And shipping companies use the codes to keep track of the packages they are delivering.

Now that you know a little about the mechanical portion of the process, take some time to learn about the different types of barcode scanners and the different ways the information can be encoded into barcodes.

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