Image
EAN-130851968007316   EAN-13 barcode 0851968007316
UPC-A851968007316   UPC-A barcode 851968007316
Product NameFive Steps to Danger
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B07B5W77HL
Price New24.99 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Run Time80 minutes
Aspect Ratio1.85:1
CastCharles Davis, Richard Gaines, Ruth Roman, Sterling Hayden, Werner Klemperer
Run Time80 minutes
BindingBlu-ray
FormatNTSC, Widescreen
Run Time80 minutes
Long DescriptionRestored from the original camera negative and presented in 1.85:1 original aspect ratio.

Stranded in a small California town after experiencing car trouble, vacationing John Emmett is spared the tedium of bus travel when he has a chance meeting with Ann Nicholson who offers him a lift if he'll agree to split the driving duties to Santa Fe. He soon learns that Ann is actually a patient recovering from a nervous breakdown, however, and a simple little road trip blossoms into a Cold War nightmare as the couple are ensnared in a web of mystery involving vital national security secrets!

Based on Donald Hamilton's "The Steel Mirror" (serialized in The Saturday Evening Post in 1948), 5 Steps to Danger stars film noir icon Sterling Hayden (The Asphalt Jungle) as a Hitchcockian hero innocently up to his neck in intrigue and danger. Ruth Roman, no stranger to noir films herself (The Window), is Hayden's love interest: a woman whose suspicious background makes her someone difficult to trust.

Directed by Henry Kessler, Danger also features several familiar classic TV faces among its supporting cast: Werner Klemperer, a two-time Emmy winner as Colonel Klink on Hogan's Heroes, portrays a psychiatrist, and daytime drama doyenne Jeanne Cooper (The Young and the Restless) is Roman's concerned nurse. Stir in uncredited contributions from Sidney Clute (Cagney & Lacey) and Ken Curtis (Gunsmoke), and you have in Five Steps to Danger a crackling good suspense thriller that will keep you guessing to the very end!
Similar Items0888574657505: Espionage Agent
0851968007293: Down Three Dark Streets
0738329228385: Ruby Gentry
0738329227715: No Orchids for Miss Blandish
0738329226695: Highway Dragnet
0644827149124: Bride of the Gorilla
0025192181207: Smooth as Silk
0010101000908: Why Must I Die?
Created04-14-2018 1:52:41am
Modified05-27-2019 5:07:34am
MD53dce1432de4b1c22331b2be03d38a80e
SHA2569dae1003b120cde646598cad98c3a3302efb1d49ab51fa652b97451301f0a4eb
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0065870

This describes how to use version 3.x of the data feed. Version 2.x of the feed is still supported. Version 1.x of the feed is no longer supported in any way.

Accessing the data requires your account to have an active data feed. This switch can be turned on or off on the data feed page. This is also where you will be able to view your KEYCODE which is required to make calls to the feed.

Main changes from version 2.x to 3.x include (but not limited to)...

Calls to the data feed are made via HTTP GET or HTTP POST requests. There are only a few required parameters when making a call.

Most other parameters are optional and they will alter the way data is returned to you and how your request is processed. You can also pass in your own values that you need carried through. Any parameter that the system doesn't recognize will be returned AS-IS in the status block. This can be handy in situations where you are pulling the data in an asyncronus manor and need extra information passed into your callback routine.

When performing a lookup...

When updating data...

There are some special "get" operations that need no other parameters. You would not use "find" or "update" when using these. Only use the "keycode", "mode" and "get" for these items. These operations are important because many of our elements are data driven and that data changes over time. We normally don't remove attributes or categories but we do often add to the collection.

The returned data can come back in JSON or XML format. In either case the structure of the data is the same. Because it is easier to read, we will be using XML to demonstrate the layout of the result. Here is the data layout. Notice that this is a complex object and some elements have child elements and some elements may be arrays with repeating content.

The easiest way to get the feel of the data is to make several requests using your web browser and ask for the data in XML format. Although JSON is often easier to work with in code, the XML output is often easier for people to read because of the nice markup tags that wrap around each element and the web browser will usually do a nice job of indenting to make it clear which elements are stored within other elements.

Close

Search

Close

Share

Close

Dialog