Image
EAN-130851968007224   EAN-13 barcode 0851968007224
UPC-A851968007224   UPC-A barcode 851968007224
Product NameAlong Came Jones
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B076F3Y3GZ
Price New12.98 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used19.97 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Run Time90 minutes
Aspect Ratio1.37:1
CastDan Duryea, Gary Cooper, Loretta Young, William Demarest
Run Time90 minutes
Width5.5 inches    (convert)
Height0.5 inches    (convert)
Length6.75 inches    (convert)
Weight20 hundredths pounds    (convert)
BindingBlu-ray
FormatNTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
Published05/11/2018
Run Time90 minutes
Long DescriptionBeautifully restored and first time on Blu-ray.

"Bronc stomper" Melody Jones rides into the sleepy little hamlet of Paynesville, with his saddle pal George, where the good townsfolk have mistaken Melody for another man with the initials "M.J." The gentleman in question is "Monte Jarrad," a bad hombre with a $1,000 price on his head for a recent stagecoach robbery. Unaware of the peril brought about by their presumed identities, Melody and George get a little help from Cherry De Longpre who's eager to get them out of town ahead of an anxious posse.

Cherry's motives aren't entirely pure, however, as she hopes her scheme will ensure the successful escape of her wounded boyfriend -- none other than the Monte Jarrad himself. But Melody becomes wise to Cherry's plotting and uses the situation to his advantage by trying to capture Jarrad, gain the reward and fame, all the while trying to escape the long arm of the law.

An actor who always rode tall in the saddle, Gary Cooper spoofs his laconic cowpoke image in Along Came Jones, playing an unconventional cowboy who can't even shoot straight! Loretta Young co-stars as Cherry, with William Demarest as Coop's loyal sidekick and Dan Duryea as the villainous Jarrad.

Based on the 1943 novel The Useless Cowboy by Alan Le May, Jones has great fun with the conventional movie Western, bolstered by an amusing script courtesy of Nunnally Johnson (who wrote Cooper's previous Casanova Brown). Directed by Stuart Heisler (The Glass Key), this sprightly comedy-western was the only time the Oscar winning Cooper added "producer" to his lengthy list of classic movie credits.

BONUS FEATURES:

- Image Gallery
- Restoration Comparison
Similar Items0888574626051: While the City Sleeps
0888574623418: Les Girls
0888574603816: Harper
0888574550080: Hanging Tree
0851968007262: Raw Deal - Special Limited Edition
0851968007125: Tomorrow Is Forever
0738329228101: Outlaw
0715515213417: Awful Truth
Created04-18-2018 1:28:58am
Modified05-30-2019 10:21:34pm
MD5ec21c1027cba26de9bb2ad437963db7c
SHA256af74a346868c2e2f254e237466dd38ddf5ab0a2a29e9c0d2b50294e84852fb77
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0028450

This symbology was developed by the MSI Data Corporation and is based on the Plessey Code symbology. MSI is most often used in warehouses and inventory control.

This is a continuous non-self-checking symbology meaning it has no predetermined length and there is no validation built into the barcode itself. If you want to validate the data stored in the barcode, you would need to use a check digit. Mod 10 is the most common check digit used with MSI but you can also use mod 1010 or mod 1110. It is allowed but generally not a good idea to omit the check digit all together.

There is a start marker which is represented by three binary digits 110 (where 1 is black and 0 is white). There is also a stop marker which is represented by four binary digits 1001. The remaining markers represent the numeric digits 0-9 (no text or special characters) and each digit is represented by twelve binary digits. Below is a table that describes all of the possible markers. The start and stop markers are the main difference between MSI and Plessey. That and the fact that MSI only covers digits 0-9. You can read these stripes as a binary values where 110 is binary 1 and 100 is binary 0. The stop marker simply has an extra bit on the end.

Character Stripe Bits Binary Value
START 110 1
0 100100100100 0000
1 100100100110 0001
2 100100110100 0010
3 100100110110 0011
4 100110100100 0100
5 100110100110 0101
6 100110110100 0110
7 100110110110 0111
8  110100100100 1000
9  110100100110 1001
STOP 1001 0 + extra stripe

 To create a graphical barcode using this process, you can simply string together a series of 1 and 0 graphic images once you have calculated what your barcode should look like using the table shown above. You can view the source code of this page if you want to see how we created the example shown below.

Code [start]375[stop]
Bits: 110 100100110110 100110110110 100110100110 1001
Graphic:

This is just an example of one way to perform the graphic encoding. It is often easier to just draw the lines instead of tacking together individual images. If you would like to create free MSI barcodes, please visit our barcode generator page. You can save the images you make and use them as needed.

Close

Search

Close

Share

Close

Dialog