Image
EAN-130826663165890   EAN-13 barcode 0826663165890
UPC-A826663165890   UPC-A barcode 826663165890
Product NameTexas Chainsaw Massacre 2
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B01AB4Y794
Model35213132
Price New20.31 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used18.98 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Run Time101 minutes
CastBill Moseley, Caroline Williams, Dennis Hopper
Run Time101 minutes
Width5.3 inches    (convert)
Height0.45 inches    (convert)
Length6.75 inches    (convert)
Weight25 hundredths pounds    (convert)
BindingBlu-ray
FormatCollector's Edition, NTSC, Widescreen
Published04/19/2016
Run Time101 minutes
Long DescriptionA retired Texas Ranger pursues a killer named Leatherface and his family of chainsaw-wielding cannibals.

Special Features Include:

Disc 1: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Part Two (New HD Transfer)

-2016 2K HD scan of the inter-positive film element
-Audio commentary with director of photography Richard Kooris, production designer Cary White, script supervisor Laura Kooris, and property master Michael Sullivan
-Audio commentary with director Tobe Hooper
-Audio commentary with actors Bill Moseley, Caroline Williams, and special effects makeup creator Tom Savini
-Extended outtakes from “It Runs in the Family” featuring L.M. Kit Carson and Lou Perryman (30 minutes)
-Behind-the-scenes footage compilation from Tom Savini’s archives (43 minutes)
-Alternate opening credit sequence
-Deleted Scenes
-Still galleries including posters and lobby cards, behind-the-scenes photos, stills, and collector’s gallery
-Theatrical trailers
-TV spots

Disc 2: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Part Two (Original HD Transfer)

-MGM’s original HD Master with color correction supervision by director of photography Richard Kooris
-“House of Pain:” An interview with make-up effects artists Bart Mixon, Gabe Bartalos, Gino Crognale, and John Vulich (42 minutes)
-“Yuppie Meat:” An interview with actors Chris Douridas and Barry Kinyon (19 minutes)
-“Cutting Moments:” An interview with editor Alain Jakubowicz(17 minutes)
-“Behind the Mask:” An interview with stunt-man and Leatherface performer Bob Elmore (14 minutes)

-“Horror’s Hallowed Grounds:” Revisiting the locations of the film, hosted by Sean Clark and a special guest (25 minutes)
-“It Runs in the Family:” A six part feature-length documentary featuring interviews with screenwriter L.M. Kit Carson, actors Bill Moseley, Caroline Williams, Bill Johnson, Lou Perryman, special makeup effects artist Tom Savini, and more… (84 minutes)

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Created04-18-2018 1:24:14am
Modified05-09-2019 11:55:29am
MD51445fece6ca74e22ab1f3abe0edc177f
SHA256a2a7e3ddd18564a37d3b679eea7a384b0df177e7e00fdd0a1e05eb6145717b9d
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0238709

Article of interest

Barcodes are a graphical representation of information that can be easily read by machines. People read text easy enough but machines find this to be too complex so we use barcodes to simplify the process.

Barcodes can store numbers, letters and all the special characters. What can be stored in the barcode depends on which type of barcode is being used. But the basics of how a barcode works is the same regardless of what type of code it is, what information is stored in the barcode or what type of scanner is being used.

barcode scanIt all starts with the scan. The scanner, regardless of which type you are using, will examine the barcode image. The lines (or blocks in the case of 2D barcodes) will either reflect or absorb light. When we look at the barcode, we tend to see the dark stripes and think of those as the important parts. Those are the parts that absorb the light and the white parts reflect the light. So the scanners tend to see the barcodes in reverse of how we think of them. But the dark and light portions of the code on their own don't automatically become the information stored in the code. In most cases, it is the relative placement and size of each dark and light stripe (or block) that make up the information. There are also special markers that help the scanner know which direction the barcode is facing when it is scanned. This allows the scanning process to work even if the barcode is upside down when it is scanned. The scanner simply processes the scanned data in reverse in this case.

barcode oscolloscopeTaking a look at an oscolloscope screen as a scanner passes over barcode, you can see that the stripes reflect back light and the scanner registers the changes as high and low levels. So what looks like a simple image is really a rather complex set of layered encryption to store the data. The encryption isn't done to hide the information in this case. Instead it is done to make it easy for the machine to read the information. Since the base language of machines is binary (1 and 0) it is easy for them to read this type of information even if it takes several steps to turn this back into something that people can understand.

binaryThe size of each high and low are combined to make binary data. A series of 1 (one) and 0 (zero) values which are strung together then decoded into the actual information. Up to this point, the process is the same for all barcodes regardless of how they are stored. Getting the lines or dots into binary is the easy part for the machine. The next step is to make this binary code into something useful to people. That step depends on  which type of barcode is being scanned. Each type of barcode has its own encoding methode. Just like human languages, what seems to be two similar words (or barcodes in this case) could actually be two very different values even though they have the same basic letters (or bars).

So you can see that the scanning devices need to know not only how to turn the bars or dots into binary, but after they have done that they need to know how to turn that binary string into the original information. But regardless of the encoding process the basic steps are the same. Process the light and dark areas, convert them to binary, decode the binary, pass the information on to the receiving device which is normally a computer program of some sort.

Once the decoded data reaches the computer program, there is no telling how the information is to be used. The grocery store will use the information to keep track of the products you purchased as you go through the register. A manufacturer will use the code to identify where they are storing their parts. And shipping companies use the codes to keep track of the packages they are delivering.

Now that you know a little about the mechanical portion of the process, take some time to learn about the different types of barcode scanners and the different ways the information can be encoded into barcodes.

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