Image
EAN-130738329216016   EAN-13 barcode 0738329216016
UPC-A738329216016   UPC-A barcode 738329216016
Product NameRoad to Rio
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B0722YQLRQ
Price New8.59 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used8.58 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Run Time100 minutes
CastBing Crosby, Bob Hope, Dorothy Lamour, Frank Faylen, Gale Sondergaard
GenreComedies
Run Time100 minutes
Width5.25 inches    (convert)
Height0.5 inches    (convert)
Length7.25 inches    (convert)
Weight25 hundredths pounds    (convert)
BindingDvd
FormatAnamorphic, Black & White, NTSC
Run Time100 minutes
FeaturesShrink-wrapped
Long DescriptionIn this fifth of seven Road to movies, Hot Lips Barton (Bob Hope, Son of Paleface) and Scat Sweeney (Bing Crosby, Road to Bali) stow away on an ocean bound ship to avoid being charged with arson after burning down a circus. Aboard the vessel, the duo fall for the beautiful Lucia Maria de Andrade (Dorothy Lamour, My Favorite Brunette). Lucia is under the spell of her evil aunt (Gale Sondergaard, The Life of Emile Zola), who has arranged a marriage for the young beauty to take over her inheritance. Just like its predecessors, Road to Rio is full of hilarious Hope and Crosby gags and wonderful musical sequences, featuring musical guests The Wiere Brothers and The Andrew Sisters. Beautifully shot by Oscar-winner Ernest Laszlo (Judgment at Nuremberg) with wonderful direction by Norman Z. McLeod (Topper) who went on to direct Hope in four more features and a screenplay by Edmund Beloin (The Lemon Drop Kid) and Jack Rose (Papa s Delicate Condition).
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Created04-13-2018 3:20:44am
Modified05-27-2019 9:07:32am
MD573d73563e5fef3c30e5e15e53dc06b18
SHA2567a1655788f69b804f065c0a0d48fbfb0f7058f0550dad1a516ea4fe0d4cde3ee
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0020649

This describes how to use version 3.x of the data feed. Version 2.x of the feed is still supported. Version 1.x of the feed is no longer supported in any way.

Accessing the data requires your account to have an active data feed. This switch can be turned on or off on the data feed page. This is also where you will be able to view your KEYCODE which is required to make calls to the feed.

Main changes from version 2.x to 3.x include (but not limited to)...

Calls to the data feed are made via HTTP GET or HTTP POST requests. There are only a few required parameters when making a call.

Most other parameters are optional and they will alter the way data is returned to you and how your request is processed. You can also pass in your own values that you need carried through. Any parameter that the system doesn't recognize will be returned AS-IS in the status block. This can be handy in situations where you are pulling the data in an asyncronus manor and need extra information passed into your callback routine.

When performing a lookup...

When updating data...

There are some special "get" operations that need no other parameters. You would not use "find" or "update" when using these. Only use the "keycode", "mode" and "get" for these items. These operations are important because many of our elements are data driven and that data changes over time. We normally don't remove attributes or categories but we do often add to the collection.

The returned data can come back in JSON or XML format. In either case the structure of the data is the same. Because it is easier to read, we will be using XML to demonstrate the layout of the result. Here is the data layout. Notice that this is a complex object and some elements have child elements and some elements may be arrays with repeating content.

The easiest way to get the feel of the data is to make several requests using your web browser and ask for the data in XML format. Although JSON is often easier to work with in code, the XML output is often easier for people to read because of the nice markup tags that wrap around each element and the web browser will usually do a nice job of indenting to make it clear which elements are stored within other elements.

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