Image
EAN-130715515212618   EAN-13 barcode 0715515212618
UPC-A715515212618   UPC-A barcode 715515212618
Product NameKing of Jazz
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie / TV
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B078FFX78J
Price New27.39 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used27.68 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Run Time98 minutes
CastBing Crosby, Paul Whiteman
Run Time98 minutes
Width5.25 inches    (convert)
Height0.55 inches    (convert)
Length6.75 inches    (convert)
Weight20 hundredths pounds    (convert)
BindingBlu-ray
FormatFull Screen, NTSC, Subtitled
Run Time98 minutes
Long DescriptionMade during the early years of the movie musical, this exuberant revue was one of the most extravagant, eclectic, and technically ambitious Hollywood productions of its day. Starring the bandleader Paul Whiteman, then widely celebrated as the King of Jazz, the film drew from Broadway variety shows of the time to present a spectacular array of sketches, performances by such acts as the Rhythm Boys (featuring a young Bing Crosby), and orchestral numbers overseen by Whiteman himself (including a larger-than-life rendition of George Gershwin's 'Rhapsody in Blue') all lavishly staged by veteran theater director John Murray Anderson and beautifully shot in early Technicolor. Long available only in incomplete form, KING OF JAZZ appears here newly restored to its original glory, offering a fascinating snapshot of the way mainstream American popular culture viewed itself at the dawn of the 1930s. BLU-RAY SPECIAL EDITION FEATURES - New 4K digital restoration by Universal Pictures, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack - New audio commentary featuring jazz and film critic Gary Giddins, music and cultural critic Gene Seymour, and musician and bandleader Vince Giordano - New introduction by Giddins - New interview with musician and pianist Michael Feinstein - Four new video essays by authors and archivists James Layton and David Pierce on the development and making of KING OF JAZZ - Deleted scenes and alternate opening-title sequence - ALL AMERICANS, a 1929 short film featuring a version of the 'Melting Pot' number that was restaged for the finale of King of Jazz - I KNOW EVERYBODY AND EVERYBODY'S RACKET, a 1933 short film featuring Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra - Two Oswald the Lucky Rabbit cartoons from 1930, featuring music and animation from KING OF JAZZ
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Created04-13-2018 1:52:24am
Modified04-29-2020 11:24:48pm
MD571f1913951be090f3cc8434c89fc23dc
SHA256cdab5d56518cb3e3573429a7168d0d393af0b2fbd789e136b870e6fdec965b18
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0197902

Article of interest

We have been asked a few times why we put a delay on the free data feed access and why someone should pay for the fast data feed access instead of just using the free version.

Put simply, the free data feed is inteded for you to use while testing your application or if you have a very low lookup requirement. You can even use the free version in production if you don't mind the forced delay in getting your databack. But if you need high volume or need fast data lookups all day long, you really do need to pay for a subscription.

The free version of the data feed will deliver a limited number of lookups each day at full speed and at no charge. Just like manual lookups, every user gets this limited number of fast lookups. Unlike manual lookups though, if you lookup the same data more than once with your data feed, it still counts as a lookup and one of your free lookups gets used. Manual lookups get repeat lookups for free. Why? Because the user gets to see our ads again and might click on one to earn us a small amount of money. You don't think we run this site for free do you?

With a subscription, all of your data feed lookups are fast no matter how many you execute in a day. Repeat lookups of the same item still count as a new lookup, but they are still just as fast as all the others. We try to optomize the data feed lookups for the subscribers to deliver the highest speed of data delivery as we can.

We have run some tests under simulated conditions using multiple computers but all using the same account. Each computer was on a separate network with its own route into our server. We did this to see variations in access time and how many lookups could be performed in a day. Each computer in the test hammered our site trying to grab unique data lookups as quickly as possible. To make this work we gave each computer a list of known codes that we knew would return valid data.

On the average, each computer in the test could perform a large number of lookups in a 24 hour period. Although each computer had different results based on the network, time of day and load on our server, over all they were all fairly close.

When in FREE  mode, they were able to average 18,000 lookups in a 24 hour period.

When in SUBSCRIPTION mode, they were able to average 129,600 lookps in a 24 hour period.

Our server processed an average of 1,684,800 lookup request during each 24 hour period while testing which is many times higher than our normal daily load. We really torchered the server to see what it could do.

You can see from these numbers that we have the ability to deliver a large amount of data. One of the largest factors in delivering the data is the network communication speed. Due to standard delays in communication, it often takes longer to ask for the data than it does for us to lookup the informaiton.

You should also quickly notice that in FREE mode, the system does a very good job of limiting how many lookups can be done. This is done by forcing a pause between the data request and returning the data to the calling application once the fast lookups are used up. And if you are asking yourself why we would force this type of delay, well it should be clear. We need to make money. It costs money and takes time to keep this site running. If you are making a lot of requests for our data, it is probably because you are trying to make money with your app so why should we not also make some money on the deal? Data feeds don't generate any ad revenue so we have to charge another way.

On the data feed page you can learn more about how the feed works and purchase a subscription if you like. 

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