Image
EAN-130086547023160   EAN-13 barcode 0086547023160
UPC-A086547023160   UPC-A barcode 086547023160
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B079M1WXV8
Price New19.95 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used14.57 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Run Time97 minutes
CastMarcel Perez
ArtistMarcel Perez
Run Time97 minutes
Width5.5 inches    (convert)
Height0.5 inches    (convert)
Length7.5 inches    (convert)
Weight22 hundredths pounds    (convert)
BindingDvd
FormatNTSC
Run Time97 minutes
Long DescriptionMarcel Perez starred in comedy shorts from 1910-1923, but his films have been unknown, lost, or unavailable until recently. His screen character and comic/directorial sensibilities have won him a new reputation among classic film fans. Now, 8 more rare Marcel Perez comedies have been located and are presented here on this follow-up to the award-winning first Marcel Perez Collection DVD. The films are presented on this release in 2K scans from archival 35mm materials from the Library of Congress and the Museum of Modern Art, with new musical scores by Ben Model. The films on the DVD are: The Near-Sighted Cyclist (1907), Some Hero (1916), Lend Me Your Wife (1916), A Scrambled Honeymoon (1916), Oh! What a Day (1918), Chickens in Turkey (1919), Pinched (1921), Wild (1921), Friday the 13th (fragment) (1923). DVD is region-free. When sold by Amazon.com, this product is manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.
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Amazon.com04-17-2018 5:44:34am
UPCChecker.com04-17-2018 5:44:42am
Product Name0086547023160
Created04-13-2018 12:08:07am
Modified04-29-2020 9:48:02am
MD52162739dd28b572453dbdc5f2a5def70
SHA256f6bf8d2a192d3245d81674faf7b455ac611b3a36bf7e4b9946234b4a5d1f983f
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0144780

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Article of interest

Barcodes are a graphical representation of information that can be easily read by machines. People read text easy enough but machines find this to be too complex so we use barcodes to simplify the process.

Barcodes can store numbers, letters and all the special characters. What can be stored in the barcode depends on which type of barcode is being used. But the basics of how a barcode works is the same regardless of what type of code it is, what information is stored in the barcode or what type of scanner is being used.

barcode scanIt all starts with the scan. The scanner, regardless of which type you are using, will examine the barcode image. The lines (or blocks in the case of 2D barcodes) will either reflect or absorb light. When we look at the barcode, we tend to see the dark stripes and think of those as the important parts. Those are the parts that absorb the light and the white parts reflect the light. So the scanners tend to see the barcodes in reverse of how we think of them. But the dark and light portions of the code on their own don't automatically become the information stored in the code. In most cases, it is the relative placement and size of each dark and light stripe (or block) that make up the information. There are also special markers that help the scanner know which direction the barcode is facing when it is scanned. This allows the scanning process to work even if the barcode is upside down when it is scanned. The scanner simply processes the scanned data in reverse in this case.

barcode oscolloscopeTaking a look at an oscolloscope screen as a scanner passes over barcode, you can see that the stripes reflect back light and the scanner registers the changes as high and low levels. So what looks like a simple image is really a rather complex set of layered encryption to store the data. The encryption isn't done to hide the information in this case. Instead it is done to make it easy for the machine to read the information. Since the base language of machines is binary (1 and 0) it is easy for them to read this type of information even if it takes several steps to turn this back into something that people can understand.

binaryThe size of each high and low are combined to make binary data. A series of 1 (one) and 0 (zero) values which are strung together then decoded into the actual information. Up to this point, the process is the same for all barcodes regardless of how they are stored. Getting the lines or dots into binary is the easy part for the machine. The next step is to make this binary code into something useful to people. That step depends on  which type of barcode is being scanned. Each type of barcode has its own encoding methode. Just like human languages, what seems to be two similar words (or barcodes in this case) could actually be two very different values even though they have the same basic letters (or bars).

So you can see that the scanning devices need to know not only how to turn the bars or dots into binary, but after they have done that they need to know how to turn that binary string into the original information. But regardless of the encoding process the basic steps are the same. Process the light and dark areas, convert them to binary, decode the binary, pass the information on to the receiving device which is normally a computer program of some sort.

Once the decoded data reaches the computer program, there is no telling how the information is to be used. The grocery store will use the information to keep track of the products you purchased as you go through the register. A manufacturer will use the code to identify where they are storing their parts. And shipping companies use the codes to keep track of the packages they are delivering.

Now that you know a little about the mechanical portion of the process, take some time to learn about the different types of barcode scanners and the different ways the information can be encoded into barcodes.

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