Image
EAN-130012569796683   EAN-13 barcode 0012569796683
UPC-A012569796683   UPC-A barcode 012569796683
Product NameTorrid Zone
LanguageEnglish
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B000MTEFX2
Model012569796683
Price New7.94 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used3.99 US Dollars    (curriencies)
IMDbIMDb Link
TrailerWatch The Trailer
Run Time88 minutes
Aspect Ratio1.33:1
CastJames Cagney, Ann Sheridan, Pat O'Brien, Andy Devine
DirectorWilliam Keighley
GenreACTION,ADVENTURE,COMEDY
Run Time88 minutes
Width5.5 inches    (convert)
Height0.5 inches    (convert)
Length7.75 inches    (convert)
Weight20 hundredths pounds    (convert)
BindingDvd
Release Year1940
FormatMultiple Formats, Black & White, Closed-captioned, Subtitled, NTSC
Run Time88 minutes
Long DescriptionBanana Company executive Steve Case on a Caribean plantation group tries to convince his former co-worker Nick Butler to take over the plantation No 7. But he is on his way to Chicago, to take over a job as a manager for another company himself. He has also troubles with US night-club singer Lee Donley, whom he wants aboard a ship back to the US, and rebel Rosario. He is able to get Nick to the plantation, but is he able to keep him there or will he leave it in a few days with Gloria, the wife of the former exectutive of No 7, Mr. Anderson ?
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Created05-22-2010
Modified05-24-2019 6:27:34pm
MD53c541fae3cb538072f4b15508450796d
SHA25670065e2f052438421512a051d87153e06a2b0a4071a99cd001c7ec7c28bb8e8b
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0197980

Article of interest

This describes how to use version 3.x of the data feed. Version 2.x of the feed is still supported. Version 1.x of the feed is no longer supported in any way.

IMPORTANT: Starting with version 3.2, we have a new property and a new way of dealing with product images. Read about it here.

Accessing the data requires your account to have an active data feed. This switch can be turned on or off on the data feed page. This is also where you will be able to view your KEYCODE which is required to make calls to the feed.

Main changes from version 2.x to 3.x include (but not limited to)...

Calls to the data feed are made via HTTP GET or HTTP POST requests. There are only a few required parameters when making a call.

Most other parameters are optional and they will alter the way data is returned to you and how your request is processed. You can also pass in your own values that you need carried through. Any parameter that the system doesn't recognize will be returned AS-IS in the status block. This can be handy in situations where you are pulling the data in an asyncronus manor and need extra information passed into your callback routine.

When performing a lookup...

When updating data...

When deleting data...

There are some special "get" operations that need no other parameters. You would not use "find" or "update" when using these. Only use the "keycode", "mode" and "get" for these items. These operations are important because many of our elements are data driven and that data changes over time. We normally don't remove attributes or categories but we do often add to the collection.

The returned data can come back in JSON or XML format. In either case the structure of the data is the same. Because it is easier to read, we will be using XML to demonstrate the layout of the result. Here is the data layout. Notice that this is a complex object and some elements have child elements and some elements may be arrays with repeating content.

The easiest way to get the feel of the data is to make several requests using your web browser and ask for the data in XML format. Although JSON is often easier to work with in code, the XML output is often easier for people to read because of the nice markup tags that wrap around each element and the web browser will usually do a nice job of indenting to make it clear which elements are stored within other elements.

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