Image
EAN-130012569505728   EAN-13 barcode 0012569505728
UPC-A012569505728   UPC-A barcode 012569505728
Product NameBrainstorm
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie / TV
Short DescriptionDVD
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B00004VVN9
Price New29.97 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used6.66 US Dollars    (curriencies)
RatingPG - Parental Guidance Suggested
IMDbIMDb Link
Run Time106 minutes
Aspect Ratio2.35:1
CastChristopher Walken, Natalie Wood, Louise Fletcher, Cliff Robertson
DirectorDouglas Trumbull
GenreSCI-FI,THRILLER
Run Time106 minutes
Width5.75 inches    (convert)
Height0.5 inches    (convert)
Length7.75 inches    (convert)
Weight25 hundredths pounds    (convert)
BindingDvd
Release Year1983
FormatClosed-captioned, Color, NTSC
Run Time106 minutes
Long DescriptionBrilliant researchers Lillian Reynolds and Michael Brace have developed a system of recording and playing back actual experiences of people. Once the capability of tapping into "higher brain functions" is added in, and you can literally jump into someone else's head and play back recordings of what he or she was thinking, feeling, seeing, etc., at the time of the recording, the applications for the project quickly spiral out of control. While Michael Brace uses the system to become close again to Karen Brace, his estranged wife who also works on the project, others start abusing it for intense sexual experiences and other logical but morally questionable purposes. The government tries to kick Michael and Lillian off the project once the vast military potential of the technology is discovered. It soon becomes obvious that the government is interested in more than just missile guidance systems. The lab starts producing mind torture recordings and other psychosis inducing material. When one of the researchers dies and tapes the experience of death, Michael is convinced that he must playback this tape to honor the memory of the researcher and to become enlightened. When another researcher dies during playback the tape is locked away and Michael has to fight against his former colleagues and the government lackeys that now run his lab in order to play back and confront the "scariest thing any of us will ever face" - death itself.
Similar Items9780783255385: Silent Running
0883929271825: Natalie Wood Collection
0883929030835: Time After Time
0883929009862: Natalie Wood Collection
0738329217310: Love with the Proper Stranger
0738329138721: Meteor
0085391112044: Looker
0025192356803: Resurrection
0025192124327: Silent Running
0025192123924: Andromeda Strain
0014381746228: Philadelphia Experiment
0008539111204: Looker
Created07-01-2006
Modified04-02-2019 2:59:29am
MD518081e9d4adc12cc56d7c1943dc5c2bd
SHA256aa40154e52353183cfd363410cdd371d36e1fcc293bb25af4befddaf6337d42a
Search Googleby EAN or by Title
Query Time0.0230339

Article of interest

We have been asked a few times why we put a delay on the free data feed access and why someone should pay for the fast data feed access instead of just using the free version.

Put simply, the free data feed is inteded for you to use while testing your application or if you have a very low lookup requirement. You can even use the free version in production if you don't mind the forced delay in getting your databack. But if you need high volume or need fast data lookups all day long, you really do need to pay for a subscription.

The free version of the data feed will deliver a limited number of lookups each day at full speed and at no charge. Just like manual lookups, every user gets this limited number of fast lookups. Unlike manual lookups though, if you lookup the same data more than once with your data feed, it still counts as a lookup and one of your free lookups gets used. Manual lookups get repeat lookups for free. Why? Because the user gets to see our ads again and might click on one to earn us a small amount of money. You don't think we run this site for free do you?

With a subscription, all of your data feed lookups are fast no matter how many you execute in a day. Repeat lookups of the same item still count as a new lookup, but they are still just as fast as all the others. We try to optomize the data feed lookups for the subscribers to deliver the highest speed of data delivery as we can.

We have run some tests under simulated conditions using multiple computers but all using the same account. Each computer was on a separate network with its own route into our server. We did this to see variations in access time and how many lookups could be performed in a day. Each computer in the test hammered our site trying to grab unique data lookups as quickly as possible. To make this work we gave each computer a list of known codes that we knew would return valid data.

On the average, each computer in the test could perform a large number of lookups in a 24 hour period. Although each computer had different results based on the network, time of day and load on our server, over all they were all fairly close.

When in FREE  mode, they were able to average 18,000 lookups in a 24 hour period.

When in SUBSCRIPTION mode, they were able to average 129,600 lookps in a 24 hour period.

Our server processed an average of 1,684,800 lookup request during each 24 hour period while testing which is many times higher than our normal daily load. We really torchered the server to see what it could do.

You can see from these numbers that we have the ability to deliver a large amount of data. One of the largest factors in delivering the data is the network communication speed. Due to standard delays in communication, it often takes longer to ask for the data than it does for us to lookup the informaiton.

You should also quickly notice that in FREE mode, the system does a very good job of limiting how many lookups can be done. This is done by forcing a pause between the data request and returning the data to the calling application once the fast lookups are used up. And if you are asking yourself why we would force this type of delay, well it should be clear. We need to make money. It costs money and takes time to keep this site running. If you are making a lot of requests for our data, it is probably because you are trying to make money with your app so why should we not also make some money on the deal? Data feeds don't generate any ad revenue so we have to charge another way.

On the data feed page you can learn more about how the feed works and purchase a subscription if you like. 

Close

Search

Close

Share