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EAN-130011301689849   EAN-13 barcode 0011301689849
UPC-A011301689849   UPC-A barcode 011301689849
Product NameTV Western Classics - 6 DVD Set - Over 14 Hours!
LanguageEnglish
CategoryElectronics / Photography: A/V Media: Movie / TV
Short DescriptionDVD
Amazon.comA Buy on Amazon ~ B0030Y1214
Price New7.59 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Price Used5.99 US Dollars    (curriencies)
Run Time870 minutes
CastAllen Case, Barry Sullivan, Clu Gulager, George Montgomery, Henry Fonda
GenreWesterns
Run Time870 minutes
Width5.5 inches    (convert)
Height1 inches    (convert)
Length7.5 inches    (convert)
Weight66 hundredths pounds    (convert)
BindingDvd
FormatMultiple Formats, Box set, Color, NTSC
Published05/25/2010
Run Time870 minutes
FeaturesFactory sealed DVD
Long DescriptionTV Western Classics - 6 DVD Set! The 1950s and 1960s were truly the Golden Age of the television western. The genre was so popular; that at one time there were over 32 hours of western dramas every week, many in the top ten, at a time when there were only three network television stations. The TV Western was pure family entertainment, and generations of fans looked forward each week to their favorite lawmen and cowboys riding into their living rooms to bring law and order to a wild and untamed land. Now, for the first time, this collection of TV Western Classics from TMG brings you over fourteen hours of action-packed drama, many of them lost but not forgotten since their original broadcasts. Every effort has been made to faithfully re-master the original quality of picture and sound to bring you the best in Western entertainment. From the dusty trail towns of west Texas, to the rough and rumble of Oklahoma Territory; these stirring tales of life in the Old West are sure to bring smiles to old fans, and find new fans too! Starting with The Deputy, starring Henry Fonda, each disc has multiple episodes of your favorite shows and western stars, including The Tall Man (Barry Sullivan and Clu Gulager), Cimarron City (George Montgomery, John Smith, Dan Blocker), The Restless Gun (John Payne), Frontier Doctor (Rex Allen), and Shotgun Slade (Scott Brady). The many guest stars who appear in these westerns reads like a who's who of Hollywood: Denver Pyle (Shotgun Slade), James Coburn (The Deputy), Alan Hale Jr. (Shotgun Slade), Robert J. Wilke (The Tall Man) and Elizabeth Montgomery (Cimarron City) to name but a few.
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Created04-17-2012 8:43:00pm
Modified06-04-2019 7:17:30am
MD5d5490ddcdc609b17ef62e44dd638a2ac
SHA256f785c985caf2502d3fc46b40e2ac93cbc0a127b22f1441a65cbb175c48e38628
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Article of interest

Barcodes are a graphical representation of information that can be easily read by machines. People read text easy enough but machines find this to be too complex so we use barcodes to simplify the process.

Barcodes can store numbers, letters and all the special characters. What can be stored in the barcode depends on which type of barcode is being used. But the basics of how a barcode works is the same regardless of what type of code it is, what information is stored in the barcode or what type of scanner is being used.

barcode scanIt all starts with the scan. The scanner, regardless of which type you are using, will examine the barcode image. The lines (or blocks in the case of 2D barcodes) will either reflect or absorb light. When we look at the barcode, we tend to see the dark stripes and think of those as the important parts. Those are the parts that absorb the light and the white parts reflect the light. So the scanners tend to see the barcodes in reverse of how we think of them. But the dark and light portions of the code on their own don't automatically become the information stored in the code. In most cases, it is the relative placement and size of each dark and light stripe (or block) that make up the information. There are also special markers that help the scanner know which direction the barcode is facing when it is scanned. This allows the scanning process to work even if the barcode is upside down when it is scanned. The scanner simply processes the scanned data in reverse in this case.

barcode oscolloscopeTaking a look at an oscolloscope screen as a scanner passes over barcode, you can see that the stripes reflect back light and the scanner registers the changes as high and low levels. So what looks like a simple image is really a rather complex set of layered encryption to store the data. The encryption isn't done to hide the information in this case. Instead it is done to make it easy for the machine to read the information. Since the base language of machines is binary (1 and 0) it is easy for them to read this type of information even if it takes several steps to turn this back into something that people can understand.

binaryThe size of each high and low are combined to make binary data. A series of 1 (one) and 0 (zero) values which are strung together then decoded into the actual information. Up to this point, the process is the same for all barcodes regardless of how they are stored. Getting the lines or dots into binary is the easy part for the machine. The next step is to make this binary code into something useful to people. That step depends on  which type of barcode is being scanned. Each type of barcode has its own encoding methode. Just like human languages, what seems to be two similar words (or barcodes in this case) could actually be two very different values even though they have the same basic letters (or bars).

So you can see that the scanning devices need to know not only how to turn the bars or dots into binary, but after they have done that they need to know how to turn that binary string into the original information. But regardless of the encoding process the basic steps are the same. Process the light and dark areas, convert them to binary, decode the binary, pass the information on to the receiving device which is normally a computer program of some sort.

Once the decoded data reaches the computer program, there is no telling how the information is to be used. The grocery store will use the information to keep track of the products you purchased as you go through the register. A manufacturer will use the code to identify where they are storing their parts. And shipping companies use the codes to keep track of the packages they are delivering.

Now that you know a little about the mechanical portion of the process, take some time to learn about the different types of barcode scanners and the different ways the information can be encoded into barcodes.

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